Teach Better Now – Assessment 2 of the NZCALNE (Voc)


APPROACHES: NZCALNE (Voc) Collection 2 is live on Pathways Awarua


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You need to check out the new content for Collection 2 of the new NZCALNE on PathwaysAwarua. We cover approaches and concepts use in adult teaching and learning.

All the great content from Te Ao Maori is still there – just updated. And we’ve widened it to include things like motivation and learner agency.

You’ll need to register as a new tertiary educator, or just log in if you already have an account. Look for the NZCALNE (Voc) pathway.

Wanna help Graeme design the new NZCALNE qualification…?


The existing NCALNE (Voc) qualification is fit for purpose for a while yet. However, the new version is on the framework. We’ve finished working on the new assessment standards. but they won’t be available until later this year.

In the meantime, it’s time to start thinking about what the redesign of our course will look like. We’ve already got a bunch of ideas, but there are few things we really need some feedback on.

Please have a read below and vote. This is a great chance to participate in a crowd-sourced design process for this new qualification.

If you have already voted on these from one of my other posts, don’t worry the site won’t let you vote again. So just have a go, and you’ll be reminded if you’ve already voted for a particular thing.

Also, if you have other ideas for content or assessment design, please let me know in the comments or by emailing assess@alec.ac.nz

How To Join Pathways Awarua As A New Tertiary Educator


Need to join Pathways Awarua so you can access the NCALNE professional development and training? This process is now streamlined.

These  instructions are current as of May 2016.Think of this as part one of a two-part process for enrolling. Please read these next bullet points:

  • Part 1 below will register you on the Pathways Awarua website.
  • Part 2 of this process is here. In part 2 you’ll need to move into our ALEC virtual classroom and complete the ENROL module.

1. Click the Tertiary Educator Registration button on the main Pathways Awarua landing page

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2. Fill in the form with your details

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3. Fill in your organisation details

  • Start typing the full name of the organisation and it should appear.
  • If you are an independent contractor and don’t belong to any particular organisation, please use the code: 9998 or contact us (assess@alec.ac.nz).
  • If your organisation is not listed you can email Pathways Awarua for support

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4. Type in a name for your class and accept the terms and conditions

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5. Click the Register button

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6. Find the NCALNE Course

  • At this point, you should see a screen like this below

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7. You should be able to click on the NCALNE (Voc) link. This will open up the course and you’ll see the main NCALNE page below.

  • Well done! You’ve now completed part 1.
  • From here you need to complete part 2. That’s where you will move into our ALEC virtual classroom and then fill out the enrolment form and share it with us.

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How to get started embedding vocabulary into your training by creating a word bank


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Vocabulary rocks…!

If you’re going to focus on just one thing when it comes to embedding literacy into your trades or vocational training it has to be vocabulary.

Vocabulary runs through all of the literacy progressions and it’s probably the best bang for your buck in terms of time spent embedding anything on the literacy side of things.

If your learners have a basic vocabulary of 2,000 high frequency words, it’s likely that they can understand  roughly 80% of the words in an academic text.

But they need to know around 95% of the words in a text before they can successfully guess the meanings of unknown words and actually make sense of a text.

The best way to get started with embedding vocabulary is to develop your own Word Banks that are focused around very specific content areas that you have to teach. Here I’m particularly talking about aspects of your teaching or training programme where there are a lot of academic, specialised, or technical words.

Once you have a Word Bank for a particular chunk of teaching, there are all sorts of things you can use it for. This includes:

  • Creating mini vocabulary diagnostic assessments for pre and post testing of learner knowledge
  • Creating all kinds of fun activities to teach and practise the language.

More on that in another post still to come.

So here’s how you go about creating the Word Bank. Think in terms of the following three categories and follow the instructions below:

  • Everyday Words
  • Academic Words
  • Specialised or Technical Words

Everyday Words – Step 3 on the Vocabulary Progression

  1. List the high-use, everyday words that relate to the content you intend to teach.
  2. You can include some less common words as long as they don’t belong in the Academic or Specialised lists.
  3. You can include words from the second thousand (2K) word list.

Academic Words – Step 4/5 on the Vocabulary Progression

  1. List the academic words you need for the content you intend to teach. Think of words that describe processes or academic tasks.
  2. You can include some of the high-use specialised words you need.
  3. And you can include words from the academic word list (AWL). Highly specialised or technical words should be in the list below.

Specialised Words – Step 6 on the Vocabulary Progression

  1. List the more highly specialised and technical words you need for the content you intend to teach.
  2. Think of the jargon of your trade or content area including specialised acronyms and informal language.
  3. You can include words outside of the 1K, 2K, and AWL.

Here’s a handy worksheet you can use to do all of this. It’s the same as the image above. I suggest you print it out A3 size or as large as you can. Click the download link below:

The scariest thing I’ve read all year about literacy and numeracy provision and funding…


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There’s not much that catches me off guard these days. However, this did. I’ve posted in a section of it below. You need to go to here to get the rest.

McDonell: I’m going to be asking you questions pertaining to two different but related areas.  The first is to gain clarifications regarding your organisations’ definition of embedded literacy and numeracy and the process you took to verify that this aligned with your funders’ definition.  Second, what actions you took regarding your quality control measures for your organisations’ embedding of literacy and numeracy into your level one and two programmes.

CEO: Understood.

McDonell: Please explain what your Organisations’ understanding of embedded literacy and numeracy is?

CEO:  We have experts who are well grounded in the details.  My role does not require in-depth knowledge of ELN, only that systems are in place to ensure it is.  My understanding of ELN is that literacy and numeracy delivery is integrated into programme delivery.

McDonell: Are you aware that the TEC had released (some time ago) a document that defines its’ high level expectations for embedded literacy and numeracy?

CEO:  I was not.

McDonell: What efforts did your organisation take to ensure it’s understanding of ELN was correct to ensure compliance with funding criteria that you were receiving?

CEO: We have specialist staff members who’s role it is to stay updated.

McDonell: And it was these, or this, staff members role to ensure the entire organisations’ level one and two programmes were aware of the definition and were compliant with it?

CEO:  Yes.

McDonell:  And you assume your staff are aware of the definition, and subsequent expectation for their provision of ELN?

CEO:  Yes.

McDonell:  Well, we are compiling their responses to a questionnaire, and interviews,  as we speak.  We can review the findings tomorrow.  For now, let’s continue.

McDonell:  Can you please explain your organisations’ process for determining the quality of your embedded literacy and numeracy provision, or even if it was occurring?

CEO: We acquisitioned a staff member to implement ELN across the organisation and ensure tutors were embedding literacy and numeracy.

McDonell:  Can you explain to the house the criteria for selection of the staff member for the position?

CEO: The individual had experience with ELN and was an experienced staff member

McDonell: In what way?

CEO: Sorry?

Go here for the rest of The Inquiry

 

 

Change in some foundation-level tutor qualification requirements: NCALNE (Voc) Requirement from 2015


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The TEC announced recently that from 2015 the NCALNE (Voc) qualification and training will be a requirement for some tutors. Here’s the announcement in full:

Beginning in 2015, the TEC will be transitioning to requiring tutors who teach foundation-level courses to hold an appropriate qualification, such as the National Certificate in Adult Literacy and Numeracy Education (Vocational/Workplace) which is known as NCALNE (Voc).

The requirement will only apply to the following funds for 2015:

  • Student Achievement Component (SAC) levels 1 and 2 (competitive and non-competitive, including the Māori and Pasifika Trades Training initiative)
  • Literacy and numeracy provision (Intensive Literacy and Numeracy, as well as Workplace Literacy).

It will not be required for foundation-level courses for:

  • SAC levels 3+
  • Youth Guarantee
  • Adult and Community Education
  • Gateway.

In the future, achievement of the NCALNE (Voc) qualification may be required for other funds.

What this change means for providers and tutors

For 2015 a transitional approach will be taken. Providers should be working with individual tutors to confirm one of the following:

  • the NCALNE (Voc) qualification has already been achieved
  • the tutor is in the process of achieving the NCALNE (Voc) qualification
  • the tutor can demonstrate competency in teaching literacy and numeracy in a way that is comparable to achieving the NCALNE (Voc) qualification. Note this option must be on a case-by-case basis and should be discussed with the TEC in advance. This option will be phased out by December 2015 (at the end of the transition period).

In October 2014, we will publish a list of which qualifications that have learning progressions and use the Assessment Tool will be exempted from the NCALNE (Voc) requirement.

A set of questions and answers has been developed to provide additional information.

More information will be made available on the TEC website in mid-October 2014 to assist tutors and providers with preparing for the 2015 transition.