Cultural Capability Trial for Foundation-Level Educators


ako brand

Here’s something new from my He Taunga Waka Colleagues at Ako Aotearoa. They would love you to trial new content they have been writing.

The focus is on working more effectively with your Māori and Pasifika learners.

You’ll need to visit Pathways Awarua to trial the new material and there’s a link to a survey to complete at the end. Your comments will be anonymous.

Please participate. Your comments will help make this work even better. If you already have an account, just log in with that. You’ll see a screen like the one in the image below once you’re underway

Cheers, Graeme

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Kia ora tātou/ Talofa/ Malo e lelei/Kia orana/ Bula vinaka/ Greetings!

We are pleased to announce the launch the Cultural Capability trial for tertiary foundation-level educators!

General information

The purpose of this trial by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) is to improve the cultural competencies of educators across the tertiary sector.

The trial is based on cultural values – values will guide any educator to attain a broader understanding of their adult learners. The Māori Cultural Capabilities pathway trial focuses on the key value of ‘ako’, the concept of learning and teaching. The Pasifika Cultural Competencies pathway focuses on ‘values’ that are embedded and practised in cultural and everyday settings of Pasifika people.

What to do?

Firstly, read the attached information. The activities are located on the Pathways Awarua site, and here is the link to get there – https://www.pathwaysawarua. com/

Reminders

  • Read the information sheet first
  • Login by creating a username and password
  • Complete the survey monkeys after each pathway to give feedback
  • This trial will remain open till the 28 February 2018

Thank you for your participation,

The He Taunga Waka team from Ako Aotearoa

Information sheet for Cultural Capability trial 2018

Greetings/kia ora /kia orana/talofalava /malo e lelei /takalofa lahi atu /ni sa bula vinaka!

The purpose of the Cultural Pathways initiative by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) is to improve the cultural capability of educators across the tertiary sector. For this trial, the TEC are focussing on Māori and Pasifika cultural capability. This information sheet provides details for about the Cultural Capability trial created by the He Taunga Waka team from Ako Aotearoa.

Tell me more about this Cultural Pathway trial?

The cultural pathways consist of some sample activities which are interactive, for trialists to engage in, and respond accordingly. There are two pathways for trialists to complete; the Māori pathway focuses on ‘ako’ (the concept of learning and teaching); and the Pasifika pathway focuses on ‘values’ that are embedded and practised in cultural settings or instilled in the everyday actions of Pasifika people.

Where are they?

These two pathways and activities can be found on the Pathways Awarua platform, an online site for adult learners seeking to sharpen their literacy and numeracy skills in real-life situations such as driving skills, dealing with money, and health and safety. It is intended that educators (such as tutors, kaiako, lecturers, and training advisors) will be able to access these cultural capability pathways for their professional development too (easy instructions are found below).

How much time will it take?

This trial takes about 45-60 minutes, and there is a short survey to complete at the end of each Pathway.

How do I access the trial?

  1. Click on  https://www.pathwaysawarua.com/   and create a login-username and password.
  2. Click on go
  3. Select a pathway (Māori or Pasifika) on the left of your screen and complete the activities.
  4. Click on the link to a short surveymonkey to complete for that pathway.
  5. Go back and select the other pathway (Māori or Pasifika) and complete the activities.
  6. Click on the link to a short surveymonkey to complete for that pathway.

What happens after the trial?

We assure trialists that your personal details and written responses will be kept confidential and private. Your responses in the surveys will inform the design of further activities on these two cultural pathways. Information gathered in the surveys will be used for educative and research purposes only; and primarily for the benefit of tertiary educators.

We wish to finally thank you for your participation in this trial

The He Taunga Waka team from Ako Aotearoa

 

How do I use macrons for words in Te Reo Māori in gmail on my Mac?


macrons

Don Brash came to me in a dream the other night and told me that I needed to figure out how to use macrons on my computer when I’m writing words in Te Reo Māori.

Actually, I’m not sure it was Don Brash. But I did figure it out.

If you’re curious, a macron is a line above a vowel. This shows that it should be spoken as a long vowel sound. For example, as in Taupō.

The meanings of words change depending on whether the vowel is short or long. For example, “keke” means cake. But kēkē means armpit.

That’s an important distinction. And I’d be interested to know if this leads to puns in Te Reo (and possibly Dad jokes).

Here are the details if you’re an Apple Mac user:

  • Click on the Apple logo in the top left and choose System Preferences.
  • Click Language & Region.
  • Click Keyboard Preferences.
  • Click the + icon and find Maori in the list.
  • Click Add.
  • Optionally, tick Show input menu in menu bar.

After I tried this, the keyboard didn’t immediately work with macrons but started adding small circles above the vowels instead.

The problem was that I was defaulting to the Australian keyboard. I deleted the Australian keyboard from the list and fixed the problem. I’m guessing that I could have probably kept it and changed the order.

To type a macronised vowel now I simply hold down Alt / Option on my Mac and then the vowel. Or with with the Shift key to type an uppercase macronised vowel.

It’s a different procedure if you’re on a Windows PC and you can find full information for all operating systems here.

I wanted this for Gmail purposes, but it’s system-wide. That means that I’ve also solved the problem for typing in WordPress and in Google Docs. I had a workaround for Google Docs but this is a lot faster.

I still need to get into the habit of using macrons. And I’ll probably forget a lot of the time. Also, I know there are plenty of words that use macrons that I’m unaware of.

So… here’s my strategy. I’m just going to pick a few that I use often and start with those.

  • Māori
  • Pākehā
  • Tāupo
  • Whānau
  • Kōrero
  • Mōrena
  • Tēnā koe
  • Kia ora kōrua
  • Ngā mihi

What words do you use often in Te Reo that have macrons?

Talking about NZ’s embedded literacy and numeracy approach with Indonesian vocational teachers at AUT


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Recently, I had the tremendous privilege and pleasure of spending a day at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) talking about literacy and numeracy with a group of vocational teachers and tutors from Indonesia.

The group was large. The image above shows half of the team and I need to paste in a second photo below so you can see the other half. Here we go…

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My sincere thanks to Dr Adrian Schoone at AUT for inviting me to join these teachers for a day in their busy schedule. Adrian also deserves credit for the two photos above.

These vocational teachers and other support staff were here on a two-week study tour in October looking at how we teach trades and vocational education in Aotearoa New Zealand.

And as part of our introductions and whakawhanaungatana (getting to know each other), I asked them all to place themselves on a giant map I had projected on the wall.

As you can see below, they came from all over Indonesia – from the West to the East.

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For my part, it was a brief and hopefully fun introduction to literacy, numeracy and the embedded approach that we’ve developed here over the last 10 years.

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We had a play with some of the online tools that we have in New Zealand for literacy and numeracy as well. Luckily, AUT had a computer lab big enough to house us all for an hour or so.

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My students for the day were friendly, engaged and worked hard to transcend some of the language barriers between us.

One of the most interesting things for me was realising how integral approaches from Te Ao Māori are now to any discussion I want to have about this work.

Concepts like ako and tuakana-teina seemed to really resonate with the group and their own cultures.

In fact, some had questions about how they could incorporate aspects of their own indigenous ways of knowing and being into their teaching practice.

Just on that note, according to Wikipedia:

  • there are over 300 ethnic groups speaking more than 700 living languages across the vast Indonesian archipelago.

So these weren’t questions I felt could readily answer, but hopefully, they will open a door to further positive discussion back home.

This, in turn, should feed into the work these excellent teachers are doing to invigorate and reinvigorate vocational education in Indonesia.

Overall, it was an excellent day,  I loved spending time with this group and I’d do it again in a heartbeat.

To my new friends and colleagues:

  • Assalam ‘alaikum. I wish you all the best with your work in Indonesia and hope our paths cross again at some stage.

 

 

Concepts: Thinking deeper and taking some notes


Kats

Nearly there. Good work so far…! Here’s what we’ve covered:

Time to do some work

Let’s stop again and make some notes. Skip back if you need to. But as before, see what you can remember. Then use the modules to check what you’ve written.

Think about how these concepts apply to your teaching. Think about your own experiences.

Here’s your task:

  • Download the worksheet, or use a chart like the one below to make notes on the concepts that we’ve talked about.
  • Can you explain each concept in your own words?
  • Can you say how each contributes to a learner-centred approach?

This task is not assessed, but it will help you with your assessment.

Concepts: What is kaitiakitanga?


Concepts in adult LN (8)

Kaitiakitanga means guardianship or caregiving.

Can we dig a little deeper?

Kaitiaki is a New Zealand term used for the Māori concept of guardianship, for the sky, the sea, and the land. A kaitiaki is a guardian, and the process and practices of protecting and looking after the environment are referred to as kaitiakitanga.

Sometimes people use the term kaitiaki for broader roles of trusteeship or guardianship.

Kaitiakitanga is both a tool and a process. It involves a set of obligations and responsibilities.

This includes a responsibility to those who have come before you as well as those who will come after. Also, its undertaking must result in a positive outcome.

In education, kaitiakitanga refers to the practical doing; rules and tikanga of a particular field. The tutor is the kaitiaki or caregiver of the learner’s knowledge. This implies certain positive responsibilities.

How does this help describe a learner-centred teaching environment?

Kaitiakitanga helps describe a learner-centred teaching environment because it describes the tutors’ role as a caregiver or caretaker with regards to our learners’ knowledge.

In education, Kaitiakitanga can refer to concepts of leadership, mentoring, coaching, care, guidance, nurturing, sharing, responsibilities, and external consultation. 

Kaitiakitanga means an approach to leadership and guidance that includes both the academic and discipline related care; as well as the more holistic and relational aspects where the main concern is for the well-being of others including one’s fellow tutors as well as learners.

When it comes to relationships, Kaitiakitanga should always be mana-enhancing. This means that it should not compromise others’ identities, self-worth, or trigger insecurities.

Here are six questions that focus on applying Kaitiakitanga to your own teaching situation. The focus here is your learners, but it could also be your co-workers:

  1. How do I show my learners that I care about this?
  2. What knowledge and experiences do I have?
  3. What skills and values can I pass on to my learners?
  4. What’s the best kind of guidance I can provide to my learners?
  5. What kind of support do they need through the journey?
  6. How can I best teach what I know?

Approaches: What is ako?


Approaches in adult LN (4)

What is it?

Ako means both teach and learn. It’s a reciprocal relationship where the educator is also learning from the student.

Ako refers to traditional Māori thinking about the transfer and absorption of skills, knowledge, wisdom, experience, much of which has traditionally occurred in the course of everyday activities.

Ako implies ‘learn’ and ‘teach’ at the same time.

In English we use two words – learn and teach – for different things. In Māori, ako is simply used for both. In this way of thinking, it is acceptable for the learner to shift roles and become the teacher and for the teacher to become the learner.

A simple way to understand ako in the shifting roles of educator and learner is this:

  • sometimes learner, sometimes teacher.

Ako works through the tuakana-teina relationship between educator and learner. As we mentioned before, while these terms have their origin in traditional Māori settings, we now use them in adult education.

How does this approach contribute to a learner-centred teaching environment?

Tuakana-teina contributes to a learner-centred teaching environment by providing us with an alternative to traditional teacher-centred methods of teaching.

Consider the following two different models of teaching and learning from our discussion about tuakana-teina. The arrows indicate the transmission of knowledge.

Teaching and learning from a Māori perspective requires two active participants. Tuakana-teina is ako in action:

Tuakana ← ako → Teina

Teaching and learning from a traditional Western perspective doesn’t always require an active learner:

Teacher teaches (active)

Learner learns (passive)

  1. Do you ever notice when you find yourself in the middle of a long monologue in your teaching?
  2. What can you put both you and your learners more at the centre of your training?

Approaches: What is tuakana-teina?


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What is it?

Tuakana-teina refers to the relationship between an older person (tuakana) and a younger person (teina). It is specific to teaching and learning in the context of Māori. In a more traditional Māori setting, the meaning is literally “older sibling-younger sibling”.

While these terms have their origin on the Marae in traditional settings, we have come to use them to talk about relationships in our adult education contexts in Aotearoa New Zealand.

For example, in education you might hear people use tuakana-teina to talk about teaching and learning in a number of different ways:

  • Peer-to-peer – teina teaches teina, tuakana teaches tuakana.
  • Younger to older – the teina has some skills in an area that the tuakana does not and is able to teach the tuakana.
  • Older to younger – the tuakana has the knowledge and content to pass on to the teina.
  • Able to less able – the learner may not be as able in an area, and someone more skilled can teach what is required.

Tuakana-teina is a mentoring approach where typically the mentors (tuakana) share their experiences, and their knowledge as well as provide information.

The tuakana is a support person and adviser for the teina and the teina gives the tuakana a chance to learn new things and meet new people.

How does this approach contribute to a learner-centred teaching environment?

Tuakana-teina relationships are essentially learner-centred in nature. Even when you (as the tutor) are the tuakana, the relationship is more of a conversation or two-way street. It’s flatter, like this:

Tuakana ↔ Teina

And less of a monologue or one-way street, like this:

Teacher

Student

By fostering and encouraging tuakana-teina relationships among your learners, you shift the balance of power in the classroom away from yourself and to your learners. This allows them to take responsibility for the learning, and often some of the teaching too.

Have a listen to Tamati talking about tuakana-teina.