About Graeme Smith

Niche education, cool technology, killer design. Also luggage.

How do I use macrons for words in Te Reo Māori in gmail on my Mac?


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Don Brash came to me in a dream the other night and told me that I needed to figure out how to use macrons on my computer when I’m writing words in Te Reo Māori.

Actually, I’m not sure it was Don Brash. But I did figure it out.

If you’re curious, a macron is a line above a vowel. This shows that it should be spoken as a long vowel sound. For example, as in Taupō.

The meanings of words change depending on whether the vowel is short or long. For example, “keke” means cake. But kēkē means armpit.

That’s an important distinction. And I’d be interested to know if this leads to puns in Te Reo (and possibly Dad jokes).

Here are the details if you’re an Apple Mac user:

  • Click on the Apple logo in the top left and choose System Preferences.
  • Click Language & Region.
  • Click Keyboard Preferences.
  • Click the + icon and find Maori in the list.
  • Click Add.
  • Optionally, tick Show input menu in menu bar.

After I tried this, the keyboard didn’t immediately work with macrons but started adding small circles above the vowels instead.

The problem was that I was defaulting to the Australian keyboard. I deleted the Australian keyboard from the list and fixed the problem. I’m guessing that I could have probably kept it and changed the order.

To type a macronised vowel now I simply hold down Alt / Option on my Mac and then the vowel. Or with with the Shift key to type an uppercase macronised vowel.

It’s a different procedure if you’re on a Windows PC and you can find full information for all operating systems here.

I wanted this for Gmail purposes, but it’s system-wide. That means that I’ve also solved the problem for typing in WordPress and in Google Docs. I had a workaround for Google Docs but this is a lot faster.

I still need to get into the habit of using macrons. And I’ll probably forget a lot of the time. Also, I know there are plenty of words that use macrons that I’m unaware of.

So… here’s my strategy. I’m just going to pick a few that I use often and start with those.

  • Māori
  • Pākehā
  • Tāupo
  • Whānau
  • Kōrero
  • Mōrena
  • Tēnā koe
  • Kia ora kōrua
  • Ngā mihi

What words do you use often in Te Reo that have macrons?

Talking about NZ’s embedded literacy and numeracy approach with Indonesian vocational teachers at AUT


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Recently, I had the tremendous privilege and pleasure of spending a day at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) talking about literacy and numeracy with a group of vocational teachers and tutors from Indonesia.

The group was large. The image above shows half of the team and I need to paste in a second photo below so you can see the other half. Here we go…

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My sincere thanks to Dr Adrian Schoone at AUT for inviting me to join these teachers for a day in their busy schedule. Adrian also deserves credit for the two photos above.

These vocational teachers and other support staff were here on a two-week study tour in October looking at how we teach trades and vocational education in Aotearoa New Zealand.

And as part of our introductions and whakawhanaungatana (getting to know each other), I asked them all to place themselves on a giant map I had projected on the wall.

As you can see below, they came from all over Indonesia – from the West to the East.

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For my part, it was a brief and hopefully fun introduction to literacy, numeracy and the embedded approach that we’ve developed here over the last 10 years.

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We had a play with some of the online tools that we have in New Zealand for literacy and numeracy as well. Luckily, AUT had a computer lab big enough to house us all for an hour or so.

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My students for the day were friendly, engaged and worked hard to transcend some of the language barriers between us.

One of the most interesting things for me was realising how integral approaches from Te Ao Māori are now to any discussion I want to have about this work.

Concepts like ako and tuakana-teina seemed to really resonate with the group and their own cultures.

In fact, some had questions about how they could incorporate aspects of their own indigenous ways of knowing and being into their teaching practice.

Just on that note, according to Wikipedia:

  • there are over 300 ethnic groups speaking more than 700 living languages across the vast Indonesian archipelago.

So these weren’t questions I felt could readily answer, but hopefully, they will open a door to further positive discussion back home.

This, in turn, should feed into the work these excellent teachers are doing to invigorate and reinvigorate vocational education in Indonesia.

Overall, it was an excellent day,  I loved spending time with this group and I’d do it again in a heartbeat.

To my new friends and colleagues:

  • Assalam ‘alaikum. I wish you all the best with your work in Indonesia and hope our paths cross again at some stage.

 

 

Job Posting – Literacy and Numeracy Facilitator


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Occasionally, I post or repost jobs relating to the adult literacy and numeracy education sector. Here’s a good one.

My friends at The Learning Wave are looking for LN Facilitators. They’re a great bunch to work for. I know as I’ve worked with them on the professional development side of things for just a little under 10 years.

If you’re a graduate of the NCALNE (Voc) or NZCALNE (Voc) and you’re looking for interesting work that combines adult literacy and numeracy with business outcomes then you should apply.

The Learning Wave have a very open mind about the location of facilitators and ways of engaging with them… What they’re after is trainers with the “X” factor. I know that applies to many of our graduates.

Because of the growth that they have forecasted, they may also be interested in people working as associates in other major facets such as leadership, health and safety leadership or learning design.

There’s a generic email address for enquiries here: roles@thelearningwave.com if you want to send a CV or bio and areas of interest.

The full job ad is here on Seek. And I’ve pasted it in below as well.


The Learning Wave are seeking people who have:

  • the empathy and patience required to work with diverse groups of learners within a team committed to the delivery of high-quality personal and business learning outcomes
  • relevant and engaging front-line, adult learning delivery skills and experience
  • the ability to support learners on a journey that is linked to business outcomes
  • a qualification such as the National Certificate in Adult Literacy and Numeracy or its equivalent.

You will be working as an associate of The Learning Wave to deliver integrated workplace literacy and numeracy programmes to a number of our business clients.

You will deliver learning programmes on-site to small groups (typically 6-9 learners). The programmes are tailored to meet the specific business requirements of our clients and their employees. You will have varied hours and work locations that will be throughout New Zealand, depending on the client’s programme and worksites.

You need to have a good understanding and experience of facilitating adult literacy and numeracy programmes in workplaces. You must be eligible to work in NZ to apply for this role. If you’re the right person, we can discuss whether this is a contractor or full-time role.

About The Learning Wave:

The Learning Wave is one of the largest government-funded workplace literacy and numeracy providers in New Zealand. Operating since 2005, we have worked with many organisations throughout New Zealand to integrate workplace literacy and numeracy skills into organisational change programmes. We have some exciting opportunities to grow our business in 2018 and need to make sure we have the right team of facilitators who can deliver to our clients.

Please send your covering letter and CV by Monday 16th October 2017.

Nearly 80,000 words later…! All collections for the NZCALNE (Voc) are now live on Pathways Awarua.


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If you follow my blog, you’ll know that over the last eight months I have only posted content relating to the new NZCALNE (Voc).

Well… we’re done. I finished the writing a few months back, but I’m very happy to report that all seven collections including all the new and revised content are now live on Pathways Awarua.

If you’re already registered, you’ll automatically have access to all of the new content. If you’re not, you can enrol as a new tertiary educator.

This has been a mammoth writing project with something close to 77,000 words of new and updated content.

I kinda feel like I’ve said everything I want to say about the NZCALNE (Voc). My sincere thanks to the awesome team at Pathways Awarua.

What’s next…? Probably, more of the same, but I’m open to ideas. Let me know.

Cheers, Graeme

 

Teach Better Now – Assessment 7 of the NZCALNE (Voc)


Teach Better Now – Assessment 6 of the NZCALNE (Voc)


Teach Better Now – Assessment 5 of the NZCALNE (Voc)