Job Posting – Literacy and Numeracy Facilitator


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Occasionally, I post or repost jobs relating to the adult literacy and numeracy education sector. Here’s a good one.

My friends at The Learning Wave are looking for LN Facilitators. They’re a great bunch to work for. I know as I’ve worked with them on the professional development side of things for just a little under 10 years.

If you’re a graduate of the NCALNE (Voc) or NZCALNE (Voc) and you’re looking for interesting work that combines adult literacy and numeracy with business outcomes then you should apply.

The Learning Wave have a very open mind about the location of facilitators and ways of engaging with them… What they’re after is trainers with the “X” factor. I know that applies to many of our graduates.

Because of the growth that they have forecasted, they may also be interested in people working as associates in other major facets such as leadership, health and safety leadership or learning design.

There’s a generic email address for enquiries here: roles@thelearningwave.com if you want to send a CV or bio and areas of interest.

The full job ad is here on Seek. And I’ve pasted it in below as well.


The Learning Wave are seeking people who have:

  • the empathy and patience required to work with diverse groups of learners within a team committed to the delivery of high-quality personal and business learning outcomes
  • relevant and engaging front-line, adult learning delivery skills and experience
  • the ability to support learners on a journey that is linked to business outcomes
  • a qualification such as the National Certificate in Adult Literacy and Numeracy or its equivalent.

You will be working as an associate of The Learning Wave to deliver integrated workplace literacy and numeracy programmes to a number of our business clients.

You will deliver learning programmes on-site to small groups (typically 6-9 learners). The programmes are tailored to meet the specific business requirements of our clients and their employees. You will have varied hours and work locations that will be throughout New Zealand, depending on the client’s programme and worksites.

You need to have a good understanding and experience of facilitating adult literacy and numeracy programmes in workplaces. You must be eligible to work in NZ to apply for this role. If you’re the right person, we can discuss whether this is a contractor or full-time role.

About The Learning Wave:

The Learning Wave is one of the largest government-funded workplace literacy and numeracy providers in New Zealand. Operating since 2005, we have worked with many organisations throughout New Zealand to integrate workplace literacy and numeracy skills into organisational change programmes. We have some exciting opportunities to grow our business in 2018 and need to make sure we have the right team of facilitators who can deliver to our clients.

Please send your covering letter and CV by Monday 16th October 2017.

Why should I beta-test the new NZCALNE online with Pathways Awarua and ALEC…?


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What do I get out of it?

Well… it’s a fair question.

Here are some reasons why you might wanna have a look at the new NZCALNE online as a beta-tester. A beta-tester is someone who tries out a brand new product and provides feedback.

  1. One great reason might be that you are actually enrolled anyway and you’re working on one of the first three assessment tasks. We’ll have the rest of the content up and live soon.
  2. Or perhaps you are a manager and you’re looking at professional development options for your staff. Have a look and then get back to us with questions.
  3. Another reason might be because you didn’t like the old NCALNE or Unit Standard 21204 and you want to see if we’ve been able to fix any of the issues. We are locked into the new NZQA unit standards, but we’ve also been able to deal with a lot of what we didn’t like about the old system.
  4. Perhaps you just love either Pathways Awarua or ALEC. Great, we love you too…! Go on… have a play and tell us what you think.
  5. You dislike what others are doing. There is at least one other competitor product to the NZCALNE out there. We’d love to know if ours is better. We think it is.
  6. You want to learn something new. Good for you. This content includes a bunch of new stuff as well as our current thinking on everything else. We’re biased of course, but this is the best work we’ve ever done.
  7. You just love the literacy and numeracy space. Nice one. So do we. It’s great to stay current.

Now get amongst it.

Ring Graeme on 0800-ALEC-1-2 or email assess@alec.ac.nz for more information

 

Beta testers wanted for the new NZCALNE (Voc) with ALEC and Pathways Awarua


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Greetings friends of ALEC and Pathways Awarua…!

We need some people to test the three new Collections we launched for the start of the new NZCALNE (Voc) online.

That means we need people who are happy to have a look through this new content and try it out. And hopefully, give us some feedback.

Steve Jobs never launched a perfect iPhone. And while we’ve proofed the material, we wanted to get it out into cyberspace as fast as possible.

That means there could be a few bugs. Also, if you can provide us with some feedback now, it’s likely that this will help us as we design, write, and launch Collections 4 to 7.

Do I have to be enrolled as a student to test the new NZCALNE (Voc)?

No, you don’t have to be enrolled. Of course, if you are enrolled then that would be even better. Here are the criteria:

  • As long as you’re someone with an interest in this professional development you can test the new Collections and their modules.
  • You need to register on Pathways Awarua as a new tertiary educator if you don’t already have an account.

This means that you might be:

  • A graduate of the older NCALNE or NCALE.
  • A tutor or manager who has an interest in foundation learning including literacy and numeracy.
  • Someone who is looking at this training as an option for staff.

Shortly, we’ll be looking to shift all of our existing ALEC students onto the new NZCALNE (Voc) with this new material.

What if I already know all this stuff but I don’t have the qualification?

We’ll also be launching our Portfolio+ version of the NZCALNE (Voc) which is a hybrid training and credentialing process for experienced tutors who have existing evidence.

If you’re interested in beta-testing this process then let us know as well.

How do I contact you?

Through the usual channels: assess@alec.ac.nz or call Graeme on 0800-ALEC-1-2

Has the NCALNE (Voc) expired?


NCALNE Expired

Well, yes it has!

It’s expiring at the moment. It’ll take a few months to breathe its last gasp but it’s been replaced.

  • If you’re still working on the expiring NCALNE (Voc) you need to switch to the newer NZCALNE (Voc).

We can help with that. Call Graeme on 0800-ALEC-1-2 or email us on assess@alec.ac.nz

In the meantime…

Out with the old and in with the new. There’s a new suite of very cool unit standards that we’ve integrated into an exciting new programme. The new stuff is lean and mean. And so much better than the old stuff (which was pretty darn good).

The new material will be available on Pathways Awarua shortly. Stay tuned here for when.

If you just can’t want and want to preview what I’ve been drafting, you can follow the links below to the first four collections. Each link will take you to a summary page for what we’re working on.

Let me know what you think. Your comments make this work better. Like our old course, it will continue to be a work in progress.

New content for the new NZCALNE (Voc)

  1. CONTEXT
    • Here we cover the New Zealand context for embedding literacy and numeracy including definitions, frameworks, and things that we associate with low levels of adult literacy and numeracy.
  2. APPROACHES
    • Here we cover concepts and approaches in adult education including from Te Ao Maori. There’s some good stuff here including short discussions about motivation, learner agency, ako, tuakana-teina and more.
  3. DEMANDS
    • This is our revamped introduction to the Learning Progressions and how to use them to map your big picture programme demands as well as the more specific demands of your teaching content.
  4. STRATEGIES
    • This is new. We look at how to write big picture strategies for embedding literacy and numeracy into your programme. And we drill down into how to take a narrow slice of this big picture and write specific learning outcomes for your teaching and assessments.

More to follow soon. And please, if you’re stopping to have a look, please let me know what’s helpful and what’s not.

 

 

DEMANDS – New Content for the new NZCALNE Assessment 3 with ALEC


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Kia ora ano and welcome back

You’re up to the third assessment task in the new and improved NZCALNE (Voc). Kai pai you…!

We’re working hard to get all new content for this and other modules live on Pathways Awarua, but until then you can find the first draft here.

The new Assessment 3 still focuses on mapping the demands of your programme using the Learning Progressions. However, the format is simpler and easier to use.

There are six short sections to complete in the new assessment task.

  • What are the big picture literacy demands?
  • What are the big picture numeracy demands?
  • What are some specific reading demands?
  • What are some specific writing demands?
  • What are some specific number demands?
  • What are some specific measurement demands?

Follow the links below

If you already know what you’re doing with mapping, please skip ahead to the assessment template. Email us if you don’t already have it. You can always come back and dip into these resources as you need to.

Overview

The Learning Progressions

Looking at the big picture for literacy

Looking at the big picture for numeracy

Getting more specific

If you’re stuck, please reach out by email here: assess@alec.ac.nz or call Graeme on 0800-ALEC-1-2

Mapping literacy and numeracy demands: Some things to think about before we move on


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From here we can move on to the fourth section in the NZCALNE and how to teach better. Up next you’re going to use your knowledge of the literacy and numeracy demands to lay out some broad strategies for embedding literacy and numeracy into your training.

And once you’ve got your strategies in place we can move on to the super practical parts of this course:

  • Collection 5 – BEFORE: Looking at diagnostic assessment and learning plans.
  • Collection 6 – TEACHING: Planning and facilitating embedded activities.
  • Collection 7 – AFTER: Measuring learner progress in literacy and numeracy.

First, though, have a think about your answers to the questions below.

The questions aren’t assessed, so you don’t have to hand in your answers. But talking about what you think with someone, particularly a colleague who already knows how to use the Learning Progressions, will help you engage with this more deeply.

Mapping demands

  • Do you feel confident that you can map and analyse the big picture literacy and numeracy demands of your programme?
  • What about when it comes to mapping and analysing specific samples and tasks from your programme? How confident do you feel about that?
  • Were there any surprises for you when you did your analysis?
  • You’ve just mapped the demands of your training, but have you started thinking about where your learners might sit on the steps and progressions in relation to these demands?

Approaches: What is learner-centred?


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What is it?

Learner centred teaching is an approach that places the learner at the centre of the learning. This means that the learner or student is responsible for learning while the tutor is responsible for facilitating the learning. This is also known as student-centred learning.

This idea of the teacher as the “facilitator” means that the focus of teaching shifts from the teacher to the student. This type of teaching should put learners’ interests first.

Why is this important?

Taking a learner centred approach is important for adult teaching environment for many reasons. One is that it helps to develop learners who can learn and work on their own. This means that it enables life-long learning and independent problem-solving.

Another reason that it’s important is that by putting responsibility for learning in the hands of learners, we encourage them to be active and responsible participants in their own learning. Learner centred teaching is now seen as good practice internationally.

By contrast, traditional education is often “teacher centred”. This means that the teacher is in the “active” role while the learners are “passive”. Very few of us are good learners when we are in this kind of “passive” role in a teaching situation.

Many of our learners who have low adult literacy and numeracy skills struggle in teacher-centred environments. Anything that you can do to make learning more “active” for them is a good thing.

Here’s a quick comparison of what learner centred teaching might include versus a more traditional teacher-centred approach.

Learner-centred

Teacher-centered

  • The focus is on both the learners and the tutor.
  • The focus is on the tutor who is the expert.
  • The focus is on how the learners will use the skills or content
  • The focus is on what the tutor knows about the skills or content.
  • Tutor models. Learners interact with tutor and each other.
  • Tutor talks. Learners listen.
  • Learners work in pairs, groups, or alone depending on the task.
  • Learners work alone.
  • Learners work without constant monitoring and correction. Tutor provides feedback or corrections as questions come up.
  • Tutor monitors and corrects.
  • Learners have some choice of topics.
  • Tutor chooses topics.
  • Learners evaluate their own learning. Tutor also evaluates.
  • Tutor evaluations student learning.
  • Learning environment (may not be a classroom) is often noisy and busy.
  • Learning environment (usually a classroom)  is quiet.