Why should I beta-test the new NZCALNE online with Pathways Awarua and ALEC…?


Screenshot 2017-04-18 09.36.16

What do I get out of it?

Well… it’s a fair question.

Here are some reasons why you might wanna have a look at the new NZCALNE online as a beta-tester. A beta-tester is someone who tries out a brand new product and provides feedback.

  1. One great reason might be that you are actually enrolled anyway and you’re working on one of the first three assessment tasks. We’ll have the rest of the content up and live soon.
  2. Or perhaps you are a manager and you’re looking at professional development options for your staff. Have a look and then get back to us with questions.
  3. Another reason might be because you didn’t like the old NCALNE or Unit Standard 21204 and you want to see if we’ve been able to fix any of the issues. We are locked into the new NZQA unit standards, but we’ve also been able to deal with a lot of what we didn’t like about the old system.
  4. Perhaps you just love either Pathways Awarua or ALEC. Great, we love you too…! Go on… have a play and tell us what you think.
  5. You dislike what others are doing. There is at least one other competitor product to the NZCALNE out there. We’d love to know if ours is better. We think it is.
  6. You want to learn something new. Good for you. This content includes a bunch of new stuff as well as our current thinking on everything else. We’re biased of course, but this is the best work we’ve ever done.
  7. You just love the literacy and numeracy space. Nice one. So do we. It’s great to stay current.

Now get amongst it.

Ring Graeme on 0800-ALEC-1-2 or email assess@alec.ac.nz for more information

 

Has the NCALNE (Voc) expired?


NCALNE Expired

Well, yes it has!

It’s expiring at the moment. It’ll take a few months to breathe its last gasp but it’s been replaced.

  • If you’re still working on the expiring NCALNE (Voc) you need to switch to the newer NZCALNE (Voc).

We can help with that. Call Graeme on 0800-ALEC-1-2 or email us on assess@alec.ac.nz

In the meantime…

Out with the old and in with the new. There’s a new suite of very cool unit standards that we’ve integrated into an exciting new programme. The new stuff is lean and mean. And so much better than the old stuff (which was pretty darn good).

The new material will be available on Pathways Awarua shortly. Stay tuned here for when.

If you just can’t want and want to preview what I’ve been drafting, you can follow the links below to the first four collections. Each link will take you to a summary page for what we’re working on.

Let me know what you think. Your comments make this work better. Like our old course, it will continue to be a work in progress.

New content for the new NZCALNE (Voc)

  1. CONTEXT
    • Here we cover the New Zealand context for embedding literacy and numeracy including definitions, frameworks, and things that we associate with low levels of adult literacy and numeracy.
  2. APPROACHES
    • Here we cover concepts and approaches in adult education including from Te Ao Maori. There’s some good stuff here including short discussions about motivation, learner agency, ako, tuakana-teina and more.
  3. DEMANDS
    • This is our revamped introduction to the Learning Progressions and how to use them to map your big picture programme demands as well as the more specific demands of your teaching content.
  4. STRATEGIES
    • This is new. We look at how to write big picture strategies for embedding literacy and numeracy into your programme. And we drill down into how to take a narrow slice of this big picture and write specific learning outcomes for your teaching and assessments.

More to follow soon. And please, if you’re stopping to have a look, please let me know what’s helpful and what’s not.

 

 

Wanna help Graeme design the new NZCALNE qualification…?


The existing NCALNE (Voc) qualification is fit for purpose for a while yet. However, the new version is on the framework. We’ve finished working on the new assessment standards. but they won’t be available until later this year.

In the meantime, it’s time to start thinking about what the redesign of our course will look like. We’ve already got a bunch of ideas, but there are few things we really need some feedback on.

Please have a read below and vote. This is a great chance to participate in a crowd-sourced design process for this new qualification.

If you have already voted on these from one of my other posts, don’t worry the site won’t let you vote again. So just have a go, and you’ll be reminded if you’ve already voted for a particular thing.

Also, if you have other ideas for content or assessment design, please let me know in the comments or by emailing assess@alec.ac.nz

What’s going to replace the NCALNE? And do you want to help me design the new NZCALNE?


Please Vote

We have some flexibility around how we structure the new version of the NCALNE (Voc) qualification.

The new qualification, which will replace the old NCALNE over the next few years, is called the New Zealand Certificate in Adult Literacy & Numeracy Education (Vocational) – or NZCALNE (Voc) for short.

The new unit standards for the new NZCALNE aren’t on the framework yet, even though the qualification is.

I’ve been thinking about what I’d like to change in terms of how we’ve been delivering the course. Above is what I’m pondering at the moment.

Please vote if you want to be part of the process for influencing the design. And add comments as well if you have anything else to say about it.

Is Anyone Still Interested In The NZ Diploma in Adult Literacy and Numeracy?


Develop Superpowers

It’s been awhile, but I’m still thinking about the New Zealand Diploma in Adult Literacy and Numeracy (NZ Dip ALNE).

This newly revised diploma is now on the NZQA framework. It’s a 120 credit level 6 qualification.

The new one is a million times better than the old one. I think I started trying to write the old one about 6 times and failed each time.

What I’d like to find out is… is anyone else still interested?

It’s a lot of work to work to write the documentation that a provider needs to get this accredited. And then there’s a lot more work to do to create the actual course content.

I have a bunch of (mostly untested) assumptions about the NZ Dip ALNE that I’d like some feedback on.

So feel free to comment here or let us know by email (assess@alec.ac.nz):

Here are some of my assumptions… in no particular order:

  1. NCALNE (Voc) and NCALNE (Educator) graduates would be interested in extending themselves through the NZ Dip ALNE. This would include those who enjoyed the personal challenge of their previous literacy and numeracy professional development and saw positive changes in their own professional practice.
  2. Graduates who are now in leadership or management roles may be interested due to the fact that the level 6 qualification is focused on leadership and informing organisational change and capability.
  3. Managers would support the further professional develop of experienced staff, particularly those who have shown an interest in embedding literacy and numeracy into their teaching.
  4. ESOL teachers and managers involved in TEC funded training could be interested as their project work could reference the needs of ESOL learners and the contexts in which they work and study.
  5. The TEC would support the training as it aligns with their current implementation strategy, priorities, and goals.
  6. Cross-crediting up to 30 credits from previous NCALNE study could provide a strong incentive for joining the course. This includes NCALNE (Voc) graduates working in trades or vocational training.
  7. Candidates would need up to 2 years to complete the qualification. And alternatively, some candidates would be able to work through the requirements faster depending on their circumstances.
  8. A series of three or four big projects based on a teaching and learning inquiry cycle and that each reference all or most of the graduate profile outcomes would be more interesting and engaging for candidates. The alternative would be a series of smaller discrete assessment tasks that step through the graduate profile outcomes, but… [sorry, just fell asleep].
  9. It would need to work (mostly) online and by distance. Although, there could be some great opportunities to bring candidates together at key times to support each other and contribute to sector development through sharing what people are learning through the work.

Some further thoughts on using three or four big projects… If you’ve done our ALEC version of the NCALNE (Voc), what I’m thinking of here is what we called your project work.

Our NCALNE (Voc) project work is a kind of inquiry cycle where you:

  • look at issues and context
  • then assess learner needs
  • design literacy and numeracy skills development
  • do some teaching
  • measure learner gains
  • and then evaluate your effectiveness.

The Diploma is bigger (120 credits instead of 40 for the Voc) and at a higher level (6 instead of 5). This means we need to turn the volume up. But if you could cross-credit up to 30 credits through a portfolio of your NCALNE (Voc) work and some other bits and pieces this would then leave you with 90 credits to complete across three big projects over two academic years.

Each project would take you through the inquiry cycle, but with a different focus each time. And because it’s a higher level course, you’d be required to provide leadership and support to other practitioners. These could be people you work with or your colleagues in other organisations.

The goal:

By the time you’ve put yourself (and your team or collaborators) through their paces three or four times, you’d have developed not just literacy and numeracy, but high-level teaching superpowers.

By this, I mean:

  • You’d know more about teaching and learning and could use the knowledge.
  • Your skills would be in much higher resolution than before.
  • You’d be consistently able to get better results.

Sure, it would be about literacy and numeracy. But actually, it would be about leadership. And getting results. And learning to teach better. And supporting learners to learn better.

The literacy and numeracy content would be the vehicle… the waka… a way to create a growing community of badass educators who can thrive in the turmoil of sustained innovation and organisation change.

 

 

NCALNE (Voc) for TESOL with Pathways Awarua


go places on PA

Do you teach ESOL? Are You Supposed To Have The NCALNE (Voc)?

If you teach ESOL in a course funded by the TEC, you may need to complete the NCALNE (Voc) qualification.

The reason for this is the TEC conditions attached to the funding. These aren’t negotiable, but we now have a solution for TESOL teachers.

  • Are you an experienced and qualified TESOL teacher?
  • Do you need to complete the NCALNE (Voc)?

In partnership with Pathways Awarua, ALEC is now trialling an NCALNE (Voc) TESOL option.

This option combines professional development work and assessment on Pathways Awarua with a portfolio of ESOL-specific evidence.

Want to know more?