Talking about NZ’s embedded literacy and numeracy approach with Indonesian vocational teachers at AUT


IMG_8677

Recently, I had the tremendous privilege and pleasure of spending a day at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) talking about literacy and numeracy with a group of vocational teachers and tutors from Indonesia.

The group was large. The image above shows half of the team and I need to paste in a second photo below so you can see the other half. Here we go…

IMG_8679

My sincere thanks to Dr Adrian Schoone at AUT for inviting me to join these teachers for a day in their busy schedule. Adrian also deserves credit for the two photos above.

These vocational teachers and other support staff were here on a two-week study tour in October looking at how we teach trades and vocational education in Aotearoa New Zealand.

And as part of our introductions and whakawhanaungatana (getting to know each other), I asked them all to place themselves on a giant map I had projected on the wall.

As you can see below, they came from all over Indonesia – from the West to the East.

IMG_8662 2

For my part, it was a brief and hopefully fun introduction to literacy, numeracy and the embedded approach that we’ve developed here over the last 10 years.

IMG_8669 2

We had a play with some of the online tools that we have in New Zealand for literacy and numeracy as well. Luckily, AUT had a computer lab big enough to house us all for an hour or so.

IMG_8671 2

My students for the day were friendly, engaged and worked hard to transcend some of the language barriers between us.

One of the most interesting things for me was realising how integral approaches from Te Ao Māori are now to any discussion I want to have about this work.

Concepts like ako and tuakana-teina seemed to really resonate with the group and their own cultures.

In fact, some had questions about how they could incorporate aspects of their own indigenous ways of knowing and being into their teaching practice.

Just on that note, according to Wikipedia:

  • there are over 300 ethnic groups speaking more than 700 living languages across the vast Indonesian archipelago.

So these weren’t questions I felt could readily answer, but hopefully, they will open a door to further positive discussion back home.

This, in turn, should feed into the work these excellent teachers are doing to invigorate and reinvigorate vocational education in Indonesia.

Overall, it was an excellent day,  I loved spending time with this group and I’d do it again in a heartbeat.

To my new friends and colleagues:

  • Assalam ‘alaikum. I wish you all the best with your work in Indonesia and hope our paths cross again at some stage.

 

 

Swimming the River: Family Impact on Education


This is an Aboriginal perspective on education. It’s a great metaphor. And there are clear links to similar discussions we have here on the same topics.

It’s just over 5 minutes long and great food for thought. Hat tip: Rachel Bulliff.

Let me know any thoughts or comments.

Free prize inside (if you come to my workshop on Thursday at the LN Symposium)


Maori Cards

This is a limited edition set of photo-cards that we made up a few years ago. I had them reprinted recently and I’ve got a bunch to give away on Wednesday and Thursday. It’s unlikely that we’ll reprint these again.

It’s small image on your screen, but each card is the size of a regular postcard.

They’re pretty cool… We use them as a resource to get people talking about Maori literacy and numeracy. The photographs are amazing and you’ll get a sense of traditional and contemporary aspects of Maori literacy and numeracy come together in the present.

We’ll give away a free set to every person who comes along to Graeme’s workshop at the LN Symposium on Thursday. We might ask you for your email address so we can contact you about the NZDipALNE when it’s ready…

If you can’t make it to the workshop then find me during the two days and ask me for a set anyway.

 

Please support the new Adult Literacy & Numeracy Education qualifications


18160132_3_logo

Well… they’re out for consultation. Here’s the breakdown from the NZQA website. This is just out and it’s now in the public domain for consultation.

Key points first: Please support the need for three distinct ALNE qualifications. These are

  1. the 40 credit NZCALNE (Voc) which replaces the NCALNE (Voc).
  2. the 80 credit NZCALNE (Ed) which replaces the NCALNE (Ed).
  3. the 120 credit NZDipALNE which replaces the NDipALNE

We think it’s going to be a coherent framework. Details still need to be fleshed out however…

The 120 credit Diploma still has some question marks attached. We think there is both a need and a demand. Please show your support for this in the comment section in the online NZQA survey which you can complete here.

Here’s how the qualifications break down. I’m pasting in from the NZQA documents:

New Zealand Certificate in Adult Literacy and Numeracy Education (Vocational/Workplace) Level 5 – (40 Credits)

This qualification is for existing practitioners who seek to develop the literacy and numeracy skills of adult learners within the context of a training or education programme.

Graduates will have applied knowledge, skills and attributes required to embed literacy and numeracy into vocational or workplace programmes.

This qualification supports the New Zealand government strategy of developing the literacy and numeracy of adults.

Graduates of this qualification will be able to:

Design (10 credits)

  • Design embedded literacy and numeracy strategies to enhance learner outcomes in a vocational or workplace programme with consideration of New Zealand’s unique context.
    • Notes: This outcome includes practice informed by historical, political and organisational contexts. Consideration will be given to add these to the qualification specifications, at the next stage of the review process.

Deliver (20 credits)

  • Foster an environment which gives primacy to learners and their learning.
    • Notes: Environment includes a values-based framework that respects: the mana and diverse cultural backgrounds of learner, the Treaty, the unique characteristics of adult learners as individuals (including literacy and numeracy skills) and what they bring to their learning, collegiality with colleagues, professional relationships with learners, … This outcome is not to be assessed separately but in conjunction with assessment of other outcomes.)
  • Apply embedded literacy and numeracy strategies in a vocational or workplace programme with consideration of New Zealand’s unique context

Assess and Evaluate (10 credits)

  • Use assessment and moderation of literacy and numeracy processes to enhance student learning.
  • Evaluate own practice to improve learner achievement through embedding literacy and numeracy.

New Zealand Certificate in Adult Literacy and Numeracy Education (Educator)
Level 5 – (80 Credits)

This qualification is for educators who seek to develop specialist expertise in adult literacy and numeracy education.

Graduates will have broad applied knowledge, skills and attributes required to apply a literacy and numeracy framework to a range of teaching and learning contexts.

This qualification supports the New Zealand government strategy of developing the literacy and numeracy of adults.

Graduates of this qualification will be able to:

Design (30 credits)

  • Design for learning to meet diverse literacy and numeracy needs of learners in a range of contexts.
    • Notes: This outcome includes practice informed by education theories, Māori literacy and numeracy concepts, approaches and frameworks, and current trends and research. Consideration will be given to add these to the qualification specifications, at the next stage of the review process.

Deliver (30 credits)

  • Foster an environment which gives primacy to learners and their learning.
    • Notes: Environment includes a values-based framework that respects: the mana and diverse cultural backgrounds of learner, the Treaty, the unique characteristics of adult learners as individuals (including literacy and numeracy skills) and what they bring to their learning, collegiality with colleagues, professional relationships with learners, … This outcome is not to be assessed separately but in conjunction with assessment of other outcomes.)
  • Select and apply adult literacy and numeracy teaching strategies and activities to meet learner needs.

Assess and Evaluate (15 credits)

  • Select and use assessment processes to identify specific literacy and numeracy learner needs and strengths.
  • Evaluate own adult literacy and numeracy practice using a range of sources for continuous improvement.

Collaboration (5 credits)

  • Collaborate with other education professionals to enhance literacy and numeracy outcomes.

New Zealand Diploma in Adult Literacy and Numeracy Education Level 6 – (120 Credits)

This qualification is for experienced educators who aspire to a leadership role in adult literacy and numeracy education.

Graduates will have in depth applied knowledge, skills and attributes required to be effective in a leadership role within adult literacy and numeracy education

This qualification supports the New Zealand government strategy of developing the literacy and numeracy of adults. Graduates will be able to inform organisational change and capability in adult literacy and numeracy education.

Graduates of this qualification will be able to:

Literacy and Numeracy Skills Development (30 credits)

  • Design for learning to meet diverse literacy and numeracy needs of learners in a range of dynamic contexts.
  • Analyse the learning environment in order to implement literacy and numeracy interventions and improve professional practice.

Issues, Theories and Trends (30 credits)

  • Analyse the educational environment in relation to literacy and numeracy issues, theories, trends and research as a basis for informing own and others’ decision making, innovation and change.
  • Utilise theory- based literature to investigate factors of Te Ao Māori to improve literacy and numeracy practice.

Lead (60 credits)

  • Analyse the learning environment in order to implement literacy and numeracy interventions and improve professional practice
  • Notes: Literacy intervention = 30 credits. Numeracy intervention = 30 credits

“Weaving” versus “tools for your toolbox” as metaphors for embedding literacy and numeracy


embedding = weaving

I’ve talked about metaphors before here. But I just wanted to add a few thoughts. My thinking behind this is that when I working with tutors, I often want to describe what we do in terms of something else that I think they already understand.

Since starting this work in 2007 the main metaphor that I’ve used is the “tools for your toolbox” approach. This metaphor works for trades because trades people use physical tools and they get it when I talk about teaching approaches, strategies, and activities as literacy and numeracy “tools” that go in their bigger “toolbox” of education and training tools.

But we also talk about embedding literacy and numeracy in terms of weaving. This metaphor comes from the world of Maori education. I wish it was original to me but it’s totally not. I’ve heard it used by many different Maori educators in different contexts and I’ve started using it myself.

It works really well. For one thing, it feels kind of organic. This is important, especially for educators who are looking for meaning outside of the more academically focused western intellectual model of mainstream education.

Another thing about the weaving metaphor is that it allows people to think of their teaching and training as a kind of real object with these mixed threads woven through it. On the one hand there are the the threads relating to content and context. And on the other, there are another set of threads relating to literacy and numeracy.

This thinking also underlies the Maori early childhood curriculum, Te Whariki which takes the woven flax mat as a metaphor.

Finally, by thinking of the embedding process, educators can see how they are also weaving other things through their training – often in addition to the literacy and numeracy which should now be business as usual. And here I’m thinking specifically of the Kaupapa Maori value system that really drives Maori and other educators working in this space.

For those new to this kind of thinking, if you see these values (wellbeing, contribution, belonging, language, exploration, for e.g.) as a further thread running though your training and interactions, you can do what we do with the literacy and numeracy. This is to make it explicit to your learners, have great conversations with them about it, and explicitly embed the value system.

I’m not saying that learners can’t learn these values or thrive in this kind of environment when they are more implicit, but our foundations-focused learners really need these values and given the chance can learn them explicitly. Just like with literacy and numeracy.

So there you go. Get the value system out of stealth mode as well and onto the radar.

Image 18-06-13 at 8.43 AM

 

Exporting the NZ’s baseline knowledge and skills for embedding literacy and numeracy


NZ-Educated-smallI’ve been excited about this before… Usually, my elation is crushed by some annoying practical reality of funding or compliance.

However, a new set of draft NZQA rules may make it possible for us to export NZ’s baseline knowledge and skills for embedding literacy and numeracy. I think there is a market for it, especially using frameworks for integrating indigenous pedagogies.

I got the NZQA draft rules by email. There’s a link to the NZQA page for consultation but this particular set of rules wasn’t there when I checked it. Hopefully, by the time you read this NZQA will have updated the online list.

If you want to see the document and the link doesn’t work, leave a message below and I’ll forward it to you. There’s a couple of key things from my side:

  • One relates to the titles of the qualifications (Page 3): I would prefer option 2, i.e. “Adult Literacy Education & Consulting (ALEC) Certificate in Adult Literacy & Numeracy Education (Vocational/Workplace).” Even though the qualification title is quite longwinded, adding our company name would increase opportunities to tie into our brand and link the training directly to us and our reputation. Having a list of countries (Option 1) would immediately limit the export opportunities and actively exclude and discourage interest from potential students.
  • The other relates to Offshore Delivery rules (Page 4): This is still not clear for me. I want to deliver the international version of my course 100% by distance using online learning via interactive modules, video lessons (like Kahn Academy), some online and print-based media and then assess portfolio evidence that the candidates submit electronically. I anticipate that any interested parties will be completing the work while they are also working part or full time and will be geographically dispersed around the world in mostly English-speaking countries. At no point am I considering opening an overseas campus in any particular location. My niche is rather small, but big enough as long as I don’t have to be constrained by the geography. Course delivery would be online from NZ. Candidates for assessment could live and work anywhere. My reading of the offshore delivery is that the scenario in mind is at a physical location in a foreign country. I’d like some clarification around this if possible.
I’d really like to support this in the strongest way possible. 
I have a very clear idea of what I want to do and I’d like to be able to do this within the NZQA framework. If these rules are a match for how I want to redevelop my product for international export I would be happy to submit it to the NZQA for approval in the very near future if you are looking for a test case, or an NZQA-friendly provider to work with in developing these rules further.
Any thoughts…?

Maori Literacy and Numeracy – NCALNE (Voc)


I’ve started using Camtasia 2 again on my Mac to record short video clips containing some of the content for the NCALNE (Voc) qualification that we deliver. It’s definitely been better this time around (despite losing a day yesterday mistakenly deleting the temporary files that I was using).

Anyway, here’s the result. I’ll probably redo everything again at some later stage, but for now I’m just trying to assemble some minimally viable video content for the web. Here’s part 1 and 2 below. Please add your thoughts in the comments