DEMANDS: NZCALNE (Voc) Collection 3 is live on Pathways Awarua


Screenshot 2017-04-19 16.08.21.png

We’d love it if you stopped by and had a read through the new content for Collection 3 of the new NZCALNE on PathwaysAwarua. We cover approaches and concepts use in adult teaching and learning.

You’ll find a plain-English introduction to the Learning Progressions. This includes a demonstration of how to map the big picture literacy and numeracy demands of your programme, as well as specific samples of your teaching materials.

You’ll need to register as a new tertiary educator, or just log in if you already have an account. Look for the NZCALNE (Voc) pathway.

APPROACHES: NZCALNE (Voc) Collection 2 is live on Pathways Awarua


Screenshot 2017-04-19 16.01.43.png

You need to check out the new content for Collection 2 of the new NZCALNE on PathwaysAwarua. We cover approaches and concepts use in adult teaching and learning.

All the great content from Te Ao Maori is still there – just updated. And we’ve widened it to include things like motivation and learner agency.

You’ll need to register as a new tertiary educator, or just log in if you already have an account. Look for the NZCALNE (Voc) pathway.

CONTEXT: NZCALNE (Voc) Collection 1 is live on Pathways Awarua


Screenshot 2017-04-19 08.25.08

Please check out the new content for Collection 1 of the new NZCALNE on PathwaysAwarua. We cover definitions, frameworks, and factors associated with low literacy and numeracy levels.

You’ll need to register as a new tertiary educator, or just log in if you already have an account. Look for the NZCALNE (Voc) pathway.

Strategies: What’s your context for embedding literacy and numeracy?


Strategies

This is the first section in your assessment. You need to summarise your particular teaching or training context. And you do this by answering three questions.

  • What kind of training or teaching do you do?
  • What kind of learners do you have?
  • What are the objectives of your programme?

We don’t need a long essay here. But we are after good analysis. Answer the questions with short paragraphs that describe your context including teaching, learners, and objectives.

This information is useful to us as it helps us get a better idea about your teaching and training context. But it’s also designed to help you focus on your own context as we start thinking about what your broad strategies might be for embedding literacy and numeracy.

If you’re stuck on objectives, here’s a few things to think about:

  • Your objectives might be formal, for example, a New Zealand Certificate or related unit standards-based training.
  • Or your objectives might be more informal such as developing work-related speaking and listening skills.
  • Or it might be something like developing CV writing or other skills.
  • Sometimes your objectives might include things that aren’t written down in your programme documents. For example, you also might have the goal of developing better attitudes or a good work ethic in your learners. Feel free to add these kinds of objectives as well.

You can skip ahead to the assessment module and download the template if you’re ready to get started on this right now.

Or if you want to, download this worksheet and make some notes. The questions are the same as what you’ll find in the assessment template.

Once you’re done, come back and we’ll have a look at the next section.

The context for adult literacy and numeracy: Some things to think about before we move on…


JDP-323.jpg

From here you can move on to the second section. Next up we’re going to look at some of the approaches we use in adult teaching.

Before that, though, you should have a think about your answers to the questions below.

The questions aren’t assessed, so you don’t have to hand in your answers. But talking about what you think with someone, and then writing down your responses will help you engage with this work more deeply.

Definitions

  • What do you think about the definitions that we’ve discussed?
  • Are there any aspects that you really like?
  • Is there anything here that you can use or absorb into your own teaching and training?

Frameworks

  • How familiar are you already with the Learning Progressions frameworks?
  • What value you can see in the Māori and Pasifika frameworks?
  • Do you think you’ll need to refer to the ESOL Starting Points framework?

Factors

  • What do you see as the major factors associated with low levels of adult literacy and numeracy?
  • What causes the biggest impact on your learners?
  • What do you think has the biggest impact on our country as a whole?

Good work…!

Literacy and numeracy definitions: What’s the difference?


contextisking-9

Similarities and differences

We’ve looked a few different meanings for literacy and numeracy. Now we need to look at how these definitions are the same or different. This is so that you can see how they apply to your teaching or to your learners.

Knowing the similarities and differences is going to help you decide what aspects of each you want to absorb into your own approach. That’s one of the things that is going to help you teach better. So while it’s the application that counts, for starters you need to think about some of the differences.

Just like you need to figure out what’s relevant for your context, you need to figure out what you think the similarities and differences are.

Here are some questions to keep in mind as you work through this process.

Literacy

  • Is the focus just on literacy?
  • People who have good literacy skills behave in certain ways. What does this behaviour look like?

Numeracy

  • Is the focus just on numeracy?
  • People who have good numeracy skills also behave differently to people who don’t. What does this behaviour look like?

Literacy and Numeracy

  • Is there a focus on both literacy and numeracy?
  • We’re most interested in the definition for embedded literacy and numeracy. There are reasons for that. What do you think they are?

Holistic

  • Is there a more holistic approach? Where does this come from?
  • How can a more holistic definition of literacy, such as from Māori and Pasifika help us in our teaching?

Economics

  • Definitions that come from government funding agencies are likely to have economic drivers. This means that under the surface there are likely to be economic incentives behind the drive to encourage and strengthen literacy and numeracy in the population.
  • Let’s assume that this is a good thing. What’s the motivation?

Social

  • Are there social consequences?
  • In other words, if we adopt a particular focus to literacy and numeracy, how can this make our communities better or worse?

Political

  • When leaders talk about literacy and numeracy in a national context – even if they don’t say so – which definition(s) are they likely to be referring to?
  • What kind of political action do you think is associated with this?

ESOL

  • Does it incorporate English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)?
  • If this is not already relevant for you, how could it be important in the future?

Time to do some work

Let’s pause for a few moments. Here’s your task:

  • Download the PDF worksheet, or use the chart below to make notes on how the six definitions we’ve discussed are similar or different.
  • Make sure you think about the questions above.

This task is not assessed, but it will help you with your assessment.

screenshot-2017-02-15-11-37-51

Teach better – What is embedded literacy and numeracy?


contextisking-3

What’s the definition?

Embedded literacy and numeracy means

Combining the development of literacy and numeracy with vocational and other skills (p.5).

Where does this definition come from?

Tertiary Education Commission (2013). Adult Literacy and Numeracy: An Overview of the Evidence, Annotated Bibliography’. Wellington: TEC

What are some key features?

Literacy and numeracy skills

  • Are contextualised to the programme. In other words, it’s not literacy and numeracy for everything. It’s literacy and numeracy for farming. Or agriculture. Or employment skills. Or whatever it is that you teach.
  • Provide learners with competence, confidence and motivation to success in the vocational or other training programme.
  • Are embedded at the level of the learner, programme and organisation.

How is this definition relevant to my teaching context?

This is relevant because it gets to the heart of what this professional development is about. In other words, how to mix in the kinds of literacy and numeracy learning that your learners need to really succeed at your course.

It’s also relevant because this is what the TEC wants and funds you to do. It’s just business as usual. But don’t forget that the motivation behind this is a good one. The embedded approach is backed up with research that says it works better for you and your learners.

Contextualising and integrating literacy and numeracy means your teaching becomes more relevant, more helpful for your learners. You’ll teach better. Learners are complex bundles of motivations. Much of the time you can’t control all the variables. But the idea here is that you can start with what you can control. That’s your approach to teaching.

Learners are complex bundles of motivations. Much of the time you can’t control all the variables. But the idea here is that you can start with what you can control. That’s your approach to teaching.

Your approach is internal to you. And you have complete access to yourself. There might be limitations in terms of resources you have to use or coursework that you have to get through. But you can choose how to approach these things.

And that’s powerful. Harness that power and you can teach better and in new ways.

You can’t know what state your learners will be in when they show up next week on Monday (or even if they will show up). But by taking an embedded approach you can set up the best conditions for learning to happen. That makes you a better teacher.