AFTER: Guidance for Supervisor or Verifier Comments


AFTER (16).jpg

Read this if

  • You are acting as supervisor or verifier for someone who is completing their NZCALNE (Voc) qualification.
  • You need to sign off on the final piece of work that one of your tutors is about to hand it before completing the NZCALNE (Voc).

Download the guidance for supervisors or verifiers

This is all contained in one PDF you can download here below. The download shows a copy of the actual template as well.

What does the supervisor or verifier need to do?

If you are the supervisor or verifier for someone completing the NZCALNE (Voc), you need to discuss the review questions with the candidate and record your comments. You can use the template on the following page or adapt to your own purposes as you need.

Collaboration between the candidate and you to review teaching delivery is one of the requirements of the NZCALNE (Voc). It’s also good teaching practice. We can’t sign off on the whole qualification unless we have some evidence of this.

For our purposes, a supervisor may include any of the following:

  • The tutor’s direct manager or programme leader.
  • A colleague that is acting as study support person.
  • Someone in management that has already acted as a supervisor or verifier for another part of this training and qualification.

What’s covered?

To sign off the final assessment task, we need evidence that tutor and supervisor have reviewed the teaching and facilitation in several areas. The best way to think of these is in regards to three reflective questions:

  • What are their strengths?
  • What are some potential improvements for future delivery?
  • How does any of this inform planning for the candidate’s professional development?

This review should be a friendly collaboration and two-way conversation. It could include teaching observation evidence, but it doesn’t have to. It’s not a performance review for internal promotional or salary review.

What do I have to do?

As their supervisor, we expect that you are already aware that the candidate is completing this qualification. You may have already verified your portfolio evidence for other parts of the course.

It’s the candidate’s job to:

  • Make the arrangements to meet with you.
  • Provide any evidence or assessment material you may wish to see in relation to this final assessment task or any part of the programme.
  • Provide you with an electronic copy of the Supervisor or Verifier Comments and Checklist template.
  • Negotiate how and when this template is completed by you.
  • Return the completed template to us as part of their supporting evidence for this final assessment task.

As supervisor or verifier, it’s your job to provide us with:

  • Your contact details including email and phone.
  • Details of when this review took place
  • Brief summary comments relating to the three reflective questions. As a guide, you might write one or two concise paragraphs totalling about 100 words for each of these. We won’t be counting words. Quality here is more important that quantity so feel free to keep it brief.
  • Your signature and date of signing at the end.

Download the guidance here for supervisors and verifiers including notes showing where and what to write for your candidate:

 

Group Observation Checklist for Listening & Speaking


This post carries on my collection of a few different diagnostic assessment tools for use with learners with literacy and numeracy issues. So far I’ve looked at:

The one below is a group observation checklist for discussion-based listening and speaking skills. This is also a stripped down, and now heavily modified version of some of the material that you can find in the Learning Progressions for Adult Literacy and Numeracy.

Once again, just so it’s clear: this is an observation checklist for a tutor or trainer to use when observing a group of learners engaged in a discussion task of some kind.

Like the other one, it’s a simple checklist that allows you to check off whether you are observing different kinds of behaviours that may indicate that learners in a group need further training with regards to discussion-based listening and speaking skills.

Again, this checklist could be part of your needs analysis and diagnostic process. Use your findings to target explicit learner and group skill development in the required areas.

You can score the answers with this one as well so you can compare over time. The higher the score, the more likely that the group needs some work in these areas.

Here’s the download link. The PDF should be the same as the images below:

GroupLSP1 GroupLSP2

Learner Observation Checklist for Listening & Speaking Skills


The other day I posted my versions of the some tools to use with learners for numeracy diagnostic assessment. I’ve also written before about creating your own contextualised vocabulary diagnostics including developing a word bank.

This post continues along the same line, but with a learner observation checklist for listening and speaking skills. This is a stripped down version of some of the material that you can find in the Learning Progressions for Adult Literacy and Numeracy.

Just so it’s clear: this is an observation checklist for a tutor or trainer to use when observing a learner. It’s not something to hand out to a learner to complete.

Basically, it’s a very simple checklist that allows you to check off whether you are seeing different kinds of behaviours that may indicate that a learner has listening and speaking difficulties of some kind.

The implication, of course, is that the checklist could be part of your diagnostic process and that you would then use your findings here to target learner skill development in the required areas.

If you want to, you can score the answers so you can compare over time. The higher the score, the more likely that the learner in question has listening and speaking issues in these areas.

Here’s the download link. The PDF should be the same as the images below:

LSP1 LSP2