Demands: Thinking deeper about your big picture numeracy demands


Knowing the demands (12)

Time to do some work

Let’s pause here again. Here’s what you need to do next:

  • Download the worksheet for numeracy, or use the chart below to get started on mapping the big picture numeracy demands for your situation.
  • As you did for literacy, say what each numeracy progression is in plain English and then rate it for importance for you. Justify your rating.
  • Then if you’ve rated a progression as important, say which tasks, calculations or what kind of work is affected. This might include work in the classroom or more practical work in other kinds of environments.

This task is not assessed, but it will help with the first part of your assessment.

Again, make sure that you keep your notes. You’ll need them for when you write up your answers in the assessment.

What are key N progressions?What are key N progressions continued?

Writing up the big picture numeracy demands

Make sure you keep your notes as you’ll want to refer to them when you write up your answers to the first part of Assessment 3.

In your assessment template, in section 3.2 you’ll need to identify the top two overall numeracy skill demands for your teaching.

Don’t forget that at this stage we are just interested in the strands and progressions that are relevant – in broad terms – to your teaching programme.

You’ll need to answer the following questions:

  • Why are these numeracy skill areas so demanding?
  • What does this affect?
  • What does this mean for learners?
  • What does this mean for teaching?
  • What does this mean for programme design?

If you’ve done enough thinking about this and you want to skip ahead to the assessment module and get started on section 3.2 you can. Just make sure you download and save the assessment template. Then come back to here when you’re ready for the next stage.

Like last time, if you want a bit more time to think about this, you can download the questions and some prompts as a worksheet here. The questions are the same as in your assessment template in section 3.2. The worksheet looks like the image below.

Screenshot 2017-03-20 09.45.26

Demands: Understanding what the numeracy progressions are…


Knowing the demands (11)

What are the big picture numeracy demands?

By identifying the most important literacy progressions for your own teaching situation, you’ve started to map the big picture demands. Now we need to do the same thing for numeracy.

By the end of this module, you should have some ideas about:

  • Which numeracy strands are relevant for your teaching.
  • Which progressions from these strands are relevant.

As with literacy, not everything here is going to be relevant. And as with literacy, we need to make sure that you:

  1. Understand what each numeracy progression is in plain English.
  2. Can eliminate any progressions that are not relevant.
  3. Identify which numeracy progressions are important for your teaching and programme and know why.

And just like with the literacy demands, we have a task for you to work on that will help you focus on the key numeracy demands for your programme.

Understanding what the numeracy progressions are

The numeracy progressions don’t repeat themselves like the literacy progressions. Instead, there is a distinct set of progressions for each numeracy strand.

You can probably guess many of them, but here are some plain English explanations.

Make Sense of Number to Solve Problems

Additive Strategies

  • Using + and – to solve problems

Multiplicative Strategies

  • Using x and ÷ to solve problems

Proportional Reasoning

  • Using fractions, decimals, %, proportions, ratios, rates to solve problems

Number Sequence

  • Knowing the sequence of numbers forwards and backwards. Includes integers, fractions, decimals, %

Place Value

  • Knowing the place and value of numbers. Includes tens, hundreds, thousands, fractions and decimals adding up to 1. Ordering and converting between fractions, decimals, %.

Number Facts

  • Knowing +, -, x and ÷ facts from memory. Also knowing fraction, decimal, and % facts.

Reason Statistically

Preparing Data

  • Sorting, organising, and representing data for analysis.

Analysing Data

  • Describing and comparing data for interpretation.

Interpreting Data

  • Interpreting and discussing data to predict and conclude

Probability

  • Knowing about chance, likelihood, and possible outcomes.

Measure and interpret shape and space

Shapes & Transformations

  • Describing and working with shapes. Includes shapes of two or three dimensions.

Location

  • Working with movement, distance, direction, bearings, grid references, maps, scales.

Measurement

  • Comparing, ordering and measuring things. Includes using the right tools, systems, formulas, estimates and conversions.

Demands: Writing up your big picture literacy demands


Knowing the demands (10)

Make sure you keep your notes as you’ll want to refer to them when you write up your answers to the first part of Assessment 3.

In your assessment template, in section 3.1 you’ll need to identify the top two overall literacy skill demands for your teaching. Remember, at this stage, we are just interested in the strands and progressions that are relevant in broad terms to your teaching programme.

You’ll also need to answer the following questions:

  • Why are these literacy skill areas so demanding?
  • What does this affect?
  • What does this mean for learners?
  • What does this mean for teaching?
  • What does this mean for programme design?

If you’ve done enough thinking about this and you want to skip ahead to the assessment module and get started on section 3.1 you can. Just download the assessment template and go for it. Then come back to here and carry on with the next stage.

If you want a bit more time to think about it, you can download the questions and some prompts as a worksheet here. The questions are the same as in your assessment template in section 3.1.

Demands: Thinking deeper about your big picture literacy demands


Knowing the demands (9)

Big picture literacy demands: Thinking deeper

Hopefully, you’ve started thinking about some of the concepts that we use in the Learning Progressions. Again, don’t worry if some of the terminology is new or seems strange.

You are, in many ways, learning a new trade and it’s important to know the names of things.

Here’s what we’ve covered so far:

We still need to get started on mapping the big picture demands for both literacy and numeracy. Then we’ll drill down to the specifics of your course materials.

Time to do some work

Let’s pause here for now. Here’s what you need to do next:

  • Download the worksheet, or use the chart below to get started on mapping the big picture literacy demands for your situation.
  • For each progression, say what it is in plain English and then rate it for importance for you. Justify your rating.
  • Then if you’ve rated a progression as important, say which tasks or what kind of work is affected. This might include work in the classroom or more practical work in other kinds of environments.

This task is not assessed, but it will help with the first part of your assessment.

Screenshot 2017-03-18 10.13.26Screenshot 2017-03-18 10.13.39

Writing up the big picture literacy demands

Make sure you keep your notes as you’ll want to refer to them when you write up your answers to the first part of Assessment 3.

In your assessment template, in section 3.1 you’ll need to identify the top two overall literacy skill demands for your teaching. Remember, at this stage, we are just interested in the strands and progressions that are relevant in broad terms to your teaching programme.

You’ll also need to answer the following questions:

  • Why are these literacy skill areas so demanding?
  • What does this affect?
  • What does this mean for learners?
  • What does this mean for teaching?
  • What does this mean for programme design?

If you’ve done enough thinking about this and you want to skip ahead to the assessment module and get started on section 3.1 you can. Just download the assessment template and go for it. Then come back to here and carry on with the next stage.

If you want a bit more time to think about it, you can download the questions and some prompts as a worksheet here. The questions are the same as in your assessment template in section 3.1. The worksheet is the same as the image below.

We’ll repeat this process for numeracy next.

Screenshot 2017-03-20 09.46.17

Demands: Understanding what the literacy progressions are…


Knowing the demands (8)

What are the big picture literacy demands?

From here you’ll be working towards completing Assessment 3. In the first part, we look at the big picture demands. By the end, you should have an idea about:

  • Which literacy strands are relevant for your teaching.
  • Which progressions from these strands are relevant.

Not everything is going to be relevant so we need to make sure of a couple of things. These are that you:

  1. Understand what each literacy progression is in plain English.
  2. Can eliminate any progressions that are not relevant for your situation.
  3. Identify which literacy progressions are important for your teaching and programme and know why.

There are a couple of tasks coming up which will pull all this together.

Understanding what the literacy progressions are

If you’ve already had a look at the strand charts, you’ll have noticed that some of the progressions pop up again in different strands. For example, each of the four literacy strands has a vocabulary progression.

Below is list of all of the literacy progressions and our “plain English” explanations of what they mean. Have a read through and then see if you can complete the task that follows.

Vocabulary

  • Knowing the meanings of words, how to use them and how they relate to each other

Language & Text Features

  • Using and understanding language, texts and parts of texts including speech

Comprehension

  • Understanding the messages, making connections with what you know and inferring meanings

Listening Critically

  • Understanding who is speaking and why. Aware of speakers’ purposes and points of view.

Interactive Listening & Speaking

  • Taking part in conversations and discussions. This includes taking turns, interrupting in a way that is appropriate and checking meanings

Using Strategies to Communicate

  • Getting ideas and information across to others in a way that is effective

Decoding

  • Knowing how to say written words out loud

Reading critically

  • Understanding who wrote something, why, and for whom.

Purpose & Audience

  • Having reasons and goals for writing. Knowing who you are writing for.

Spelling

  • Writing words in a way that is correct and consistent.

Planning & Composing

  • Deciding what to write about. Then recording ideas.

Revising & Editing

  • Making changes and corrections to writing. The aim is that the writing is clear, meets your purpose and engages with the audience.

Demands: What and where are the Learning Progressions support material?


Knowing the demands (7)

There are other support materials that you can access as well. You don’t need these to complete the assessment for this part of the course. But you might want to come back to this material later on.

For example, the support materials contain ideas for diagnostic assessment which is part of your Assessment 5. And they also contain lots of ideas for literacy and numeracy teaching activities which is part of your Assessment 6.

We will provide these links again later when relevant. But if you want them now:

Literacy

Numeracy

So how do I do the mapping?

We’re getting there…! We just need to make sure that you’re well set up before we get started on the actual mapping.

The Learning Progressions framework is not really complex. But there is a lot of information to take in. We’re just taking it slowly.

There’s only one more thing to look at and you can do that while you get started on mapping the big picture demands.

So in the next section, we’ll get started but we also want to make sure that you understand the different progressions and what kinds of skills or knowledge they describe.

Demands: What are my resources for mapping?


Knowing the demands (6)

Your organisation may already have printed copies of the Learning Progressions support materials or strand charts. But there are a couple of other ways that you can access the reference material.

The Strand Charts

You can download the strand charts here. We’ll provide these download links again later. But if you want them now, you can download the individual strand charts below. Like we said earlier, your assessment will only focus on the reading and writing for literacy, and number and measurement for numeracy.

Literacy

Numeracy

If you have a printed copy of the Learning Progressions for Adult Literacy and Numeracy you’ll find the Strand Charts at the back of each book.

These books contain further information about each of the strands and progressions. If you want your own copy, you can download the PDFs below.

These are handy to have as reference material when you’re doing your mapping. If you download these now, make sure you work through the material here first before diving into them.

There is also an online version of the Strand Charts that you can access here.