BEFORE: More examples – Number diagnostics


Screenshot 2017-05-09 16.49.51

This is one of three numeracy resources that we mentioned earlier in Collection 3. You can download it here if you need to.

You’ve already seen our versions of the number diagnostic questions and the attitude questions. But if you want to have a look at the originals, the details are below.

Number Attitude self-assessment

  • We talked about how to use the attitude survey and self-assessment earlier.
  • You can see the originals on page 96 and read an explanation on page 9.
  • Using a self-assessment like this gives you useful data on learner confidence. This is something that can change over the short term. So it’s useful to measure it in some way.

Number diagnostic questions

  • You’ve seen half of these already. We showed you diagnostic questions for the “knowledge progressions”. The reason for this is that they’re easier and faster to administer.
  • But you might also want to have a look at the diagnostic questions for each of the three “strategy” progressions. These are more interesting, but they are also more time consuming to use.
  • You can find everything between pages 10 to 15.

Examples of contextualised number diagnostic questions

  • On pages 90 to 93, you can find some more examples of contextualised number diagnostics.
  • Page 90 looks at a budgeting scenario and covers number sequence, additive, and multiplicative strategies.
  • Page 91 looks at number knowledge required to understand data presented in a newspaper article on a medical condition. This is interesting because it’s a set of reading comprehension questions. But you need to understand the maths involved to answer the questions.
  • Page 93 also looks a number knowledge in the context of a newspaper article but from a different context. This time the context is data relating to violence against police.

 

BEFORE: Are there any other examples of numeracy diagnostic assessments from the Learning Progressions Resources?


BEFORE (33)

Other there other numeracy diagnostic assessments I can look at?

Yes, there are. But first, let’s figure out where you’re up to and what you need to do.

You may already have a good idea of what you want to do for your contextualised numeracy diagnostic. If you do, you should get on with it now.

  • Skip this section if you already know what you are doing for your contextualised numeracy diagnostic.

But if you’re unsure, there are at least two things you can do to move forwards.

One is to see if you can adapt something from one of the scenarios that we discussed earlier.

The other is to carry on here. This may also be because you may wish to tackle other specific numeracy skills that we haven’t discussed.

If you’re still looking for ideas, the supporting resources for the Learning Progressions contain a range of different diagnostic assessments that you could use for ideas or modify to suit your context.

If you’re still looking for ideas, here is a range of more generic diagnostic assessments that you could contextualise for your own purposes.

Up next: we’ll point you to other diagnostic assessments for these strands:

  • Teaching adults to make sense of number to solve problems
  • Reason statistically
  • Measure and interpret shape and space.

BEFORE: Number facts diagnostic assessment


Here are some generic questions you can use or adapt for place value. You can download a word doc version of this here.

Number facts

Go to the next question if you are not sure how to answer.

  1. 2 + 3 = _______________
  2. 10 – 6 = _______________
  3. 50 + 7 = _______________
  4. 9 + 9 = _______________
  5. 13 – 7 = _______________
  6. 6 x 4 = _______________
  7. 8 x 7 = _______________
  8. 27 ÷ 3 = _______________
  9. 200 x 80 = _______________
  10. 5 million ÷ 10 = _______________
  11. 2³ = _______________
  12. What is ¾ as a %? _______________
  13. Write all the numbers (factors) that fit into both 18 and 30 have in common?

____________________________

BEFORE: Place value diagnostic assessment


Here are some generic questions you can use or adapt for place value. You can download a word doc version of this here.

Place Value
Go to the next question if you are not sure how to answer.

  1. A CD player costs $80. How many $10 notes do you need to pay for it?______________
  2. A TV costs $470. How many $10 notes do you need to pay for it? _______________
  3. A car costs $45 400. How many $100 notes do you need to pay for it? _______________
  4. Write any number that lies between 7.59 and 7.6 _______________
  5. What is 135% as a decimal? _______________
  6. 10³ = _______________

Don’t forget: There are fewer questions here because the other knowledge from Number Sequence and Number facts for step 1 is already in place. The first pair of questions here start at step 2.

BEFORE: Number sequence diagnostic assessment


Here are some generic questions you can use or adapt for number sequence. You can download a word doc version of this here.

Number Sequence
Go to the next question if you are not sure how to answer.

  1. Which number is one more than 9?  _______________
  2. Which number is one less than 16? _______________
  3. Which number is one more than 89? _______________
  4. Which number is one less than 50? _______________
  5. Continue the pattern: 5, 10, 15, ______, ______, ______
  6. Which number is ten more than 499? _______________
  7. Which number is ten less than 843? _______________
  8. Write these fractions in order from the smallest to the largest: 

    Screenshot 2017-05-11 13.25.39______________________________

  9. What number is 1 more than 989,999? _______________

  10. What number is one less than 603 000? _______________
  11. Write these fractions in order from smallest to largest:
    Screenshot 2017-05-11 13.25.49
    ______________________________
  12. Put these in order from smallest to largest: 20%, 0.259, 1/4, 0.21 ______________________________

 

 

BEFORE: What are some examples of other numeracy diagnostics that I can adapt or modify?


 

Before the Assessment Tool, we used several handy sets of generic numeracy diagnostic questions. You can still use these and they work great…!

There are generic diagnostic questions for each of the following progressions:

  • Number Knowledge
  • Place Value
  • Number facts

You’ll find the questions over the next few pages and there’s a worksheet for each to download if you want to use or adapt them.

Plenty of tutors in many different contexts have used these questions as a starting point for writing and contextualising their own diagnostic assessments for numeracy.

Each pair of questions in each section focuses on one step from one of the Progressions above.

Before you ask, the questions in the Place Value Progression – that’s the middle set of questions – start at step 2. That’s why there are fewer questions. This implies that the other knowledge from Number Sequence and Number facts for step 1 is already in place.

Also, there’s a Youtube clip. Just click to watch it as a movie with 5 sec intervals between questions. There’s no audio. If you use it with your learners then read the questions out loud.

Pro tips for creating your own contextualised numeracy diagnostic assessments


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You can skip this if you like. But here are a few suggestions to improve the quality of your contextualised numeracy diagnostics:

Write plain-English instructions

The same rules here apply as we discussed in our earlier discussion about using plain-English. This time you need to make sure that your instructions are written in plain English.

Keep the technical jargon to a minimum. Your learners shouldn’t have to struggle with understanding your instructions if you’re trying to assess their numeracy skills. Here are a few guidelines:

  • Keep it simple.
  • Use words if necessary.
  • Use diagrams or visual explanations if you can.
  • Don’t use jargon.

Make sure you are clear about your numeracy learning outcome

You may not be used to working with explicit learning outcomes for numeracy. Or for literacy either.

But if there’s any kind of secret sauce to the embedding approach, at least part of it involves having learning outcomes that are clear and explicit.

Remember, our approach to writing learning outcomes means that you force yourself to target very specific aspects of numeracy (or literacy). Writing down the learning outcome is what makes it explicit.

But don’t get locked in either. Treat your learning outcomes as a continual “work in progress”. Each time you use a learning outcome it’s an opportunity for you to fine tune it or see how it evolves into something new and more relevant for your learners and your programme.

Do a good job of unpacking those calculations

Another aspect of good practice here is how well you go about unpacking any calculations or maths-related tasks that your learners have to do or use in their context.

Here’s the process one more time. This time, we’ve written the steps as questions:

  1. What do you know now about your programme and your learners?
  2. What is your learning outcome and do you need to change it?
  3. Have you unpacked what your learners need to know and do in order to do the task?
  4. Have you started to develop some diagnostic questions based on what you’ve unpacked?