Has the NCALNE (Voc) expired?

NCALNE Expired

Well, yes it has!

It’s expiring at the moment. It’ll take a few months to breathe its last gasp but it’s been replaced.

  • If you’re still working on the expiring NCALNE (Voc) you need to switch to the newer NZCALNE (Voc).

We can help with that. Call Graeme on 0800-ALEC-1-2 or email us on assess@alec.ac.nz

In the meantime…

Out with the old and in with the new. There’s a new suite of very cool unit standards that we’ve integrated into an exciting new programme. The new stuff is lean and mean. And so much better than the old stuff (which was pretty darn good).

The new material will be available on Pathways Awarua shortly. Stay tuned here for when.

If you just can’t want and want to preview what I’ve been drafting, you can follow the links below to the first four collections. Each link will take you to a summary page for what we’re working on.

Let me know what you think. Your comments make this work better. Like our old course, it will continue to be a work in progress.

New content for the new NZCALNE (Voc)

  1. CONTEXT
    • Here we cover the New Zealand context for embedding literacy and numeracy including definitions, frameworks, and things that we associate with low levels of adult literacy and numeracy.
  2. APPROACHES
    • Here we cover concepts and approaches in adult education including from Te Ao Maori. There’s some good stuff here including short discussions about motivation, learner agency, ako, tuakana-teina and more.
  3. DEMANDS
    • This is our revamped introduction to the Learning Progressions and how to use them to map your big picture programme demands as well as the more specific demands of your teaching content.
  4. STRATEGIES
    • This is new. We look at how to write big picture strategies for embedding literacy and numeracy into your programme. And we drill down into how to take a narrow slice of this big picture and write specific learning outcomes for your teaching and assessments.

More to follow soon. And please, if you’re stopping to have a look, please let me know what’s helpful and what’s not.

 

 

STRATEGIES – New content for the new NZCALNE Assessment 4 with ALEC

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NZCALNE (voc) Assessment 4 – New Content

Kia ora ano and welcome back once again to TEACH BETTER NOW

You’re up to the fourth assessment task in the new and improved NZCALNE (Voc). Excellent work…!

We’re working hard to get all new content for this and other modules live on Pathways Awarua, but until then you can find the first draft on here on the blog as always.

Feel free to leave a comment and tell us what’s useful or if something is confusing. Your comments help us to make the content better.

The new Assessment 4 is an entirely new section that wasn’t in the expired NCALNE (Voc). This is a look at strategies for embedding literacy and numeracy into your programme.

There are four sections to complete:

  • 4.1 What’s your context?
  • 4.2 What are your opportunities and constraints?
  • 4.3 What are your broad strategies for literacy and numeracy?
  • 4.4 What are some specific learning outcomes?

What’s it all about?

The idea with this task is to start looking at your own teaching context and then come up with some broad strategies for embedding literacy and numeracy. And then take a couple of smaller slices of these, and narrow them down to specific learning outcomes.

You’ll use these learning outcomes in the last three assessments to guide you through the process of creating and using diagnostic assessments, planning and delivering your teaching, and measuring learners’ progress.

Follow the links below

If you already know what you’re doing, please skip ahead to the assessment template. You can always come back and dip into these resources as you need to. Email us directly if you don’t already have the template and checklist.

Otherwise, as this is new content for you (like some of it was for us) it might be quite good to skim through the material that we’ve put together.

Overview

This is the fourth of seven collections covering the knowledge and skills you need to teach better by embedding literacy and numeracy into your training.

By the end of this fourth section, you will have covered:

  • What you need to know to develop broad strategies for embedding literacy and numeracy into your programme.
  • How to structure specific learning outcomes for embedding literacy and numeracy into your teaching sessions.

This next content area breaks down into four modules. Here’s what’s ahead:

1. What’s your context?

Here you’ll need to reflect on what kind of teaching or training you do, what kind of learners you have, and what your main objectives are. These objectives might be formal, like achieving unit standards. Or they might be more informal, like understanding health and safety requirements or being able to fill out a form.

Read more:

2. What are your opportunities and constraints?

You’ll need to identify some of the opportunities where you could contextualise literacy and numeracy in your teaching. But also, you’ll need to look at what some of the constraints or barriers to implementing this approach in your work.

Read more

3. What are your broad strategies for literacy and numeracy?

In this module, you’ll design a couple of broad strategies for embedding literacy and numeracy into your programme.

Read more about literacy strategies:

Read more about numeracy strategies

Read more about learner centred teaching

4. What are your specific learning outcomes?

Once you’ve got an idea about the broad strategies you want, you’ll learn how to focus on some specific parts of these. You’ll do this by learning how to write learning outcomes for embedded literacy and numeracy teaching.

We’ll focus on learning outcomes here so that in the next stage, you’ll be able to develop your own specific assessments and teaching activities that relate to these.

Just to sum up, this stage takes us from the more general, big picture strategies which apply across your programme, down to specific learning outcomes for particular aspects of literacy and numeracy that you want to embed into your teaching sessions with learners.

Introducing learning outcomes:

Read more about how to write specific kinds of learning outcomes

Strategies and learning outcomes:

If you’re stuck, please get in touch with us by email here: assess@alec.ac.nz or by texting or calling Graeme on 0800-ALEC-1-2

 

Strategies and learning outcomes: Some things to think about before we move on

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Hey, well done! You’ve got your strategies and learning outcomes in place now. Make sure you remember to submit your completed assessment to us.

Just to recap:

  • Your strategies focus on the big picture – usually, your programme as a whole.
  • Your learning outcomes focus on a narrow slice of this bigger picture. The focus is on some very specific teaching and assessing that you want to do.

All that’s left from here is the project work. The project work is the teaching practice part of the course. There are three assessments, and they are linked together. Think of them as one project.

  • Assessment 5 – BEFORE: Looking at diagnostic assessment and learning plans.
  • Assessment 6 – TEACHING: Planning and facilitating embedded activities.
  • Assessment 7 – AFTER: Measuring learner progress in literacy and numeracy.

The connection between the tasks is that you’ll need to track the same learners through the three stages. And you’ll report back on how you and they get on at each stage.

Before we move on, though, have a think about your answers to the questions below. The questions aren’t assessed, but talking about what you think with someone, particularly a colleague, will help you engage with the learning more deeply.

Strategies and learning outcomes

  • Do you feel that you have described your context accurately and concisely?
  • Are you clear on what some of the main opportunities and constraints are that you have in front of you?
  • Are you confident that you can describe a broad, “big picture” strategy for embedding both literacy and numeracy into your programme?
  • Are you confident that you can describe some specific learning outcomes for embedding aspects of this strategy into your teaching?

How to write your own learning outcomes for embedding measurement

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For Measurement

You can do this yourself or download the worksheet here.

Instructions

  1. Choose one item below then add your own context.
  2. Write out a final draft of the learning outcome.
  3. If you need to, make any changes to ensure your learning outcome is specific to the measurement skills you want to teach and assess.
Compare and order objects

Use repetition of a single unit to measure length, area, volume and capacity, weight, angle, temperature, time

Use sensible units to measure length, area, volume and capacity, weight, angle, temperature, time

Use common benchmarks to estimate measurements

Carry out simple unit conversions

Calculate the area and perimeter of rectangles, triangles and circles from measurements of length

Convert units within measurement systems

Use appropriate units, tools and formulas to measure the surface areas and volumes of shapes, including cylinders

 

in the context of…

How to write your own learning outcomes for embedding number

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For Number

You can do this yourself or download the worksheet here.

Instructions

  1. Choose one item from each box and then add your own context.
  2. Write out a final draft of the learning outcome below.
  3. If you need to, make any changes to ensure your learning outcome is specific to the number skills you want to teach and assess.
Use

Remember

Describe

Discuss

Apply

Demonstrate how to use

strategies to solve addition and subtraction problems

strategies to multiplication and division problems

strategies to solve problems involving fractions, decimals and percentages

strategies to solve problems involving proportions, ratios, and rates

number sequence knowledge

place value knowledge

number facts knowledge

in the context of…

How to write your own learning outcome for embedding writing

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You can do this yourself or download the worksheet here.

Instructions

  1. Choose one item from each box and then add your own context.
  2. Write out a final draft of the learning outcome below.
  3. If you need to, make any changes to ensure your learning outcome is specific to the writing skills you want to teach and assess.
Remember

Identify

Recognise

Describe

Understand

Explain

Discuss

Apply

Use

Demonstrate

purpose and audience strategies

spelling strategies

everyday vocabulary

academic vocabulary

technical vocabulary

language and text features

planning and composing tools and strategies

revising and editing tools and strategies

in the context of…

How to write your own learning outcomes for embedding Reading

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Writing your own learning outcomes

If you have already started writing your learning outcomes and you’re happy with the way it’s going, please carry on. Finish off the assessment and submit your work to us for comment.

If you need some more support, please read on…! We can walk you through the process of writing learning outcomes for the following four areas:

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Number
  • Measurement

Just click through to the content that you need. There is a worksheet for each as well as notes.

We haven’t focused on listening, speaking, or statistics. If these are relevant to your learners, you’re welcome to follow the guidelines and write your own learning outcomes for these instead.

How to write your own learning outcomes for Reading

You can do this on your own or download the worksheet here here.

Instructions

  1. Choose one item from each box and then add your own context.
  2. Write out your own final draft of the learning outcome.
  3. If you need to, make any changes to ensure your learning outcome is specific to the reading skills you want to teach and assess.
Remember

Identify

Recognise

Describe

Understand

Explain

Discuss

Apply

Use

Demonstrate

decoding strategies

everyday vocabulary

academic vocabulary

technical vocabulary

knowledge of language and text features

comprehension strategies

critical reading strategies

in the context of…

What are some examples of learning outcomes for literacy and numeracy?

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Here are some more examples of learning outcomes for literacy and numeracy. Feel free to use, adapt or modify these to suit your own purposes. Or if you’re already sorted, skip ahead to the next module.

Don’t forget: You only need two learning outcomes in total for your project work – one for literacy and one for numeracy.

Reading

  • Explain technical vocabulary in the context of basic tool identification for carpentry.
  • Discuss academic vocabulary in the context of preparing for an examination
  • Use comprehension strategies in the context of identifying potential consequences of health and safety hazards in a commercial kitchen.
  • Use knowledge of language and text features in the context of recognising specialised text types such as standard operating procedures and instruction manuals.

Writing

  • Use spelling strategies in the context of writing everyday, Māori and scientific names for common trees.
  • Explain technical vocabulary in the context of writing a glossary of terms.
  • Use planning and composing tools and strategies in the context of writing a job application letter.
  • Use revising and editing tools and strategies in the context of writing a short report.

Speaking and listening

  • Use listening comprehension strategies in the context of following instructions on how to mix agricultural sprays
  • Discuss technical vocabulary in the context of an introduction to arc welding.
  • Explain specialised language used in the context of a tailgate meeting.
  • Use interactive listening and speaking skills in the context of an employment interview.

Number

  • Use strategies to solve addition and subtraction problems in the context of calculating hours worked in a week.
  • Discuss strategies to solve multiplication and division problems in the context of calculating a 25% discount off a retail price.
  • Use strategies to solve problems involving simple fractions in the context of breaking up a paddock.
  • Demonstrate number facts knowledge in the context of fraction, decimal and percentage conversions used in hairdressing.

Measurement

  • Use common benchmarks to estimate measurements in the context of working out how long the side of a building is.
  • Use sensible units, tools and formulas to measure the side lengths and areas of rectangles in the context of working out how much compost is needed for a home garden.
  • Use sensible units, tools and formulas to measure the side lengths and areas of triangles and rectangles in the context of working out how the amount of paint needed for a wall.
  • Carry out simple conversions between grams and kilograms in the context of baking a sponge cake.

How do I write a learning outcome?

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For your project work for this course, you need to write at least two learning outcomes. Our suggestion is that you write one for literacy and another for numeracy.

These learning outcomes need to focus on a skill that you want to develop in a specific context.

For example, you might want to focus on developing specialised vocabulary in the context of reading a complicated recipe. If it was numeracy, you might need to look at developing learners understanding of area in the context of a farming or horticulture.

You can make changes as you go along, but the idea is that your learning outcomes should guide what you do over the next three assessments. This includes using diagnostic assessments, planning and teaching and then measuring your learners’ progress.

Writing a learning outcome for embedded literacy or numeracy is easy if you do it our way. Just like with writing your broad strategies, we have a process for you to work through.

If you already know how to write embedded learning outcomes, feel free to skip ahead to the assessment template and get underway.

Otherwise, stay here and we’ll walk you through the process. Following the overview, you can download the worksheets you need and record your ideas for learning outcomes as you work through the rest of this module.

If you want all of the worksheets now, they are also here:

  • Reading – Writing your own learning outcomes
  • Writing – Writing your own learning outcomes
  • Number – Writing your own learning outcomes
  • Measure – Writing your own learning outcomes

1. Think of a specific context where your learners need to apply these skills

If you were about to start a new course with new learners this might be something they need to learn in the first week of training. For example:

  • an introduction to health and safety in the engineering workshop.

Alternatively, you might know that your existing class was about to start a practical project where they had to cut pieces of timber to build a picnic table, the context might look like this:

  • building a picnic table according to a plan.

It’s important to define a very specific context for your learning outcome. The reason is that these outcomes will guide everything we do from here.

When you wrote your big picture strategies you contextualised them to your programme as a whole. This time, when you write your learning outcomes you’re narrowing your focus and contextualising them to some very specific aspects of the content that you teach.

Often, the more specific and narrow you can be about this the better.

2. Target a specific skill that you want them to learn or practice

You should have already identified specific literacy and numeracy skills. These are the progressions and steps from your mapping in the last assessment. And you might have also built these into your strategies in the previous module.

Now, just identify what the skill or knowledge is that you want to focus on.

For example, in a new course students may have to read or view content online that contains a lot of unfamiliar and highly specialised words. The specific skill literacy area that you might want to focus on could be this:

  • Technical vocabulary

Then add your context from the last step, like this:

  • Technical vocabulary in the context of an introduction to health and safety in the engineering workshop.

If it was something else, using a metric tape accurately measure and then cut pieces of timber for a picnic table, you might write something like this:

  • How to use millimeters and metres to measure and cut length

Again, we can add the context from the previous step:

  • How to use millimeters and metres to measure and cut length in the context of building a picnic table according to a plan.

3. Frame the learning

Here we’re talking about what kind of learning you want to see. You can frame the learning in different ways. It depends on the level of your learners and whether you want to make it easier or more challenging.

Here are some words you can use to frame the learning. These words sit on a poutama or staircase. At the lower levels are words that describe learning that is less demanding. As you go up the stairs, the learning gets harder. Each level assumes that they can do the one below.

Apply

Use

Demonstrate

Understand

Explain

Discuss

Remember

Identify

Describe

Choose one of the words and add it to the front of your statement. For example:

  • Understand technical vocabulary in the context of an introduction to health and safety in the engineering workshop.
  • Demonstrate how to use millimeters and metres to measure and cut length in the context of building a picnic table according to a plan.

What we’re suggesting here is a guide. You know your programme and your content. If you can think of ways of tweaking, improving, or simplifying your learning outcomes you should do it. It’s normal to go through several drafts before you come up with something that really works well.

For example, the second example above could be simplified like this:

  • Use millimeters and metres to measure and cut length in the context of building a picnic table according to a plan.

What do learning outcomes for embedded literacy and numeracy look like?

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Here are some examples of learning outcomes written by trades and vocational tutors.

Embedded literacy learning outcomes

  • Explain technical words in the context of an introduction to arc welding.
  • Explain specialised language used in the context of a tailgate meeting.
  • Use reading comprehension strategies in the context of following instructions on how to mix agricultural sprays

Embedded numeracy learning outcomes

  • Carry out a GST calculation in the context of room rates required for a catering job
  • Demonstrate how to measure and calculate area for squares and rectangles in the context of building industry expectations using a steel or folding rule.
  • Record 12 and 24 hour time in the context of job and timesheets.